Australian Jade Perch

 Jade Perch Man
 
 
 

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jade perch fry

jade perch fry

Jade Perch Australia

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The PERCH MAN ABN is 42 065 149 145

Site last updated 21st July 2021 New video services available for commercial farmers. Introduction video click here  Content example here

Tank of adults underwater 640x363 Click to see short video "Jade perch hatchery to plate in under 3 minutes"

Recommended reading on aquaponics

Recommended food supplier www.bignutrition.com.au

Did you want to buy silver perch fingerlings? click here

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AQUACULTURE CONSULTING On site advice is available to existing and potential growers of Australian freshwater fish. Advice is based on over 30 years experience and hands on practice. click for more

Also see the members area of this web site, Technical Information "Client area" Clients can log in here for technical information on jade perch, silver perch, sleepy cod and Murray cod. The information included here covers many aspects of these species, including habitat information which can be used to fill in some of the knowledge gaps. Information about jade perch goes back to the original "pioneer" growers who started growing jade perch in the 90s in Queensland Australia, the home of the species. This hand full of growers had to learn things the hard way. Their knowledge was built from a base knowledge on silver perch. There had been plenty of quality government research done with silver perch, but almost nothing had been, or ever was done, on jade perch. They learned everything the hard way. Information like, how low the water temperature could go, before they stopped growing, and at what temperature would they actually start to die, were learnt by killing fish. This sort of information, as well as over 30 of years knowledge, and experience, can be found here. The information is constantly being up-dated. 

HOW TO USE THE MEMBERS AREA

To access this area of the jadeperch web site click on "membership" on the top menu bar. Once you have signed up you will notice that the "membership" button on the menue bar now has a "Technical Information" drop down list. Just click on Technical Information, and you are in. click for more

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 From out of nowhere, the aquaculture of Jade Perch has become one of the fastest growing freshwater fish species in the world.

For the aquaculture of any species to succeed there needs to be a few basic "boxes ticked". The success of JADE perch as an aquaculture species is because the species ticks so many of these boxes. They are relatively hard to kill, the grow fast, they don't need expensive aquaculture diets to grow well, and they are very popular as a table fish in one of the worlds biggest seafood markets, that's the Asian community. When I say the "Asian community" I am not saying, "Asian countries", but I am saying Asian communities in any country. In Australia, the species found its early market acceptance within the Chinese restaurants in the major capital cities of Australia. This provided the jumping off point for the species to gain its current success in Asian communities world wide. The biggest box the species has ticked it the "health" box. It is extraordinarily high in omega-3. With all the knowledge now known about the benefits of omega-3. The "health box tick", was the final quailty needed to guarantee the species market success. This market potential is massive. I predict this species will be produced in most countries around the world over the next few years. It is already settling into markets in countries like Vietnam, mainland China, Taiwan, and Malaysia. Europe and USA are starting to test the species too. There is no reason these countries, and any future country to try them will not see exactly the same growth in market demand as the first countries that tried it have enjoyed.

The name, "Jade Perch" was chosen because of the distinctive greenish, (JADE) colour displayed by the fish as the light catches the dorsal area scales. The name was chosen by 3 of the pioneer growers of JADE perch while sitting around the kitchen table of the, then president for the Aquaculture Association of Queensland Inc., Bruce Sambell. (The PERCH MAN.) The common, local name, was Barcoo Grunter, which does not sound as pleasant as JADE perch.

3200gmsJadePerch

Healthy food - Australian Jade Perch a super food

There are good and bad fats. We hear a lot about the "bad" saturated fats.

But some other fats, "good fats", like Omega-3 fatty acids are absolutely required for normal health and development. They're building blocks of every living cell in your body.

Omega-3 fatty acids must be obtained from the diet for good health.
Thousands of scientific research studies have shown that Omega-3s can help strengthen and protect every cell in your body - and especially those cells in your heart, brain and joints.

Omega-3s also have been shown to help lower triglyceride levels contributing to a 50% reduction in the risk of death from heart disease in people with a diet rich in Omega-3 nutrients.
Diets enriched with Omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent some risk factors associated with cardiovascular and heart disease.
It's important to note that you must get Omega-3s through diet or nutritional supplements because the human body can't make them on its own.
Omega-3s are essential nutrients found in fresh, Australian JADE Perch. They are scientifically proven to nourish every living cell, significantly impacting heart, brain and joint health.

Omega-3 benefits improve, Cartilage Health, Heart Health, Joint Health, Brain Health and Mother’s Health, not to mention our general health and well being.

You can improve your life with the proven health benefits of Omega-3 contained in quality Australian Jade Perch !

Click for recipes and Hints

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Australian Jade Perch Jade Perch really seem to grow very fast. Some growers have even said, twice as fast as silver perch. The feeding behavior of Australian Jade Perch is normally vigorous in the extreme. The fish race towards the end of the pond where the approaching farmer is about to feed, creating quite a bow wave as they begin to break the surface with their heads. Once they reach the edge of the pond they will extent their entire head from the water in anticipation of a feed. 

This behaviour decreases in intensity as the temperature drops. Under 18c surface feeding will almost stop. Some farmers have experienced stock losses during winter. Although harvesting fingerlings in water temperatures around 14-15c without losses is common practice on some hatchery farms. Unlike wild caught fish, grow-out fish have large quantities of fat within their body cavity. 
They grow extremely fast and will be highly suited to districts having moderate sub tropical to tropical temperatures. They are also proving to be a good species for recirculating systems, RAS. (Unlike Silver Perch which are very difficult to grow beyond a few hundred grams in a RAS.) See the members area for full details.

Jade perch are a freshwater species. However, they are quite hardy and can tolerate a range of water quality parameters. Intensive culture environments can at times result in poor water quality, and rapid changes could mean the difference between good growth rates and increase susceptibility to disease. Regular monitoring of water quality is strongly advised. 

Quality fingerlings don't just happen.

Quality fry/fingerlings are the result of good brood fish management. We produce fish, specificly for grow out farms. For over a quarter of a century I have been line breeding our fish. Selecting for desirable qualities such as body shape, disease resistance, spots, and of course, fast growers. Our breeders have been selected each season from fish obtained from our fingerling customers in Australia and our own "super shooters", and fresh wild fish. That is many generations of line bred fish! Click for more

Our fingerlings are produces under a Fish Health certification Program

Feeding Jade Perch fry and fingerlings

There are a number of suitable foods that I have used over the years. Currently we use products from Big Nutrition www.bignutrition.com.auand Ridley.
I use one of the Ridley products for the baby fish. Native "DUST". This product is best suited to fish between 10mm and 100mm. Fish of larger sizes will eat this "dust" but they should be moved on to larger sized food as soon as possible. The dust spreads over the water surface allowing all the fish to get to the food. 
All fish getting to food helps reduce excess size variation in fish. About half the food floats. Ideal as it allows visual observation of feeding behaviour. The "members area" has more detail about food including a video of the dust being fed to jade perch.

WARNING: There is another fish, the Scortum Hillii, commonly known as the Leathery Grunter. It is called the Leathery Grunter because of its incredibly tough eating quality. These two fish are very difficult for even the trained eye to tell apart ! The same name has been applied to similar looking fish from Gulf Drainage rivers in the northern part of Australia. Be sure to purchase your fingerlings from a reputable hatchery. The brood fish should be Scortum Barcoo from the Barcoo River Basin in Central Australia. This will ensure that you get the "good" eating fish. 
One final comment, they grow bloody fast in the warm months (Sept-May) in South Queensland! We predict a great future for this fish.

Below are pictures of the "impostor fish," Scortum hilii. There is no noticeable difference in their appearance. These picture were taken on the river bank of a wild fish just caught in a gill net.

scortumhillii Click pictures to enlarge.

Pictured below left is a young jade perch with younger jade perch in its stomach. Right are market size jade perch. 

 100 3853                 500gramjadeperch

Jade perch are cannibalistic.

For more jade perch information click here

The members area has detailed information about jade perch, including growing and disease management  click for more

 

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS
By viewing this website, or any links from this website, or engaging or paying for consulting services, you accept these terms and conditions.
The information provided by  Bruce Sambell, or any of his associates colleagues or employees, or pages and sub-directories of this website, including videos, are provided as a general service. The information and advice provided is made available in good faith and is derived from sources believed to be reliable and accurate at the time. However, the information is provided solely on the basis that persons will be responsible for making their own assessment on any matters contained or discussed herein and are advised to verify all relevant representations, statements, information and advice. Changes in circumstances after material is placed on this website or any links, or videos, may impact on the accuracy of the information. No assurance is given as to the accuracy of any representation, statement, information or advice. Neither Bruce Sambell, nor any of his associates, colleagues or employees accept any responsability for any losses whatsoever or agents, nor any employee shall be responsible or liable for any loss, damage or injury (including death) howsoever caused (whether caused by any negligent or other unlawful act or omission of, or by associates colleagues or employees of Bruce Sambell. No responsability is accepted, for any losses whatsoever, arising from the use of or reliance on any information, data or advice (including incomplete, out-of-date, wrong, inaccurate or misleading information, data or advice): expressed or implied information provided within this website, verbally, or in any links to videos or orther websites, or expressed or implied in, or coming from, any person whosoever associated with Bruce Sambell, or Bruce Sambell himself.
Any information provided here should be considered as one of many information resources available. All persons including corporate entities should consider all available information.
You are solely resopnsable to confirm any information provided by Bruce Sambell, his associates colleagues or employees, and to consider all other sources of information available.
COPYRIGHT   All material contained in this website is subject to copyright.

DISEASE FREE CERTIFICATION FOR FRY

 

 

 

 

DISEASE FREE CERTIFICATION FOR FRY

FHCP

 

Identifying disease pathogens Copy 

FISH HEALTH CERTIFICATION PROGRAM (FHCP)
Our fingerlings come from a disease free certified hatchery.
The FHCP places the following fish health and biosecurity conditions to ensure that fish health management is consistently maintained by :
1.  Keeping of fish health records
2.  Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for quarantine, disinfection, disease investigation, disease treatment and control
3.  Reporting of significant or notifiable diseases
4. Regular veterinary inspection program of the facility

Since 2005, in association with the translocation of live fish out of Queensland and overseas, our hatchery has a consistent record of submitting samples of fish for health testing to the Queensland Government Biosecurity Sciences Laboratory. These tests are comprehensive. They include gross, and histology examination, (histopathology) of each sample submitted. This is where the sample, (Usually about 30 fish from each batch or pond.) is sliced into ultra thin, transparent sections which are then examined under a microscope by a highly qualified Queensland Government fish pathologist.
These tests are a requirement for batches of fish sent to aquaculture facilities outside the state of Queensland.


In 2010, our hatchery volunteered to participate in a new government scheme designed to better capture the health of fish at aquaculture facilitys. This new scheme developed by the Queensland Government, the Fish Health Certification Program, (FHCP) requires samples to be sent on a regular basis regardless of where the fish were to be sold.
The FHCP carries out regular disease surveillance testing by gross and histopathology performed by the Biosecurity Sciences Laboratory (BSL) of the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF-Qld), Queensland State Government. The purpose of health testing is to afford the highest probability of detecting significant and notifiable diseases in the fish intended for sale and translocation to other states, or overseas. As such the timing of sampling and the numbers of fish to sample greatly influence this probability. For example, young fish prior to leaving the hatchery should be sampled if a viral disease is of interest and the number of fish should be sufficient to detect at least 1 positively infected fish in the sample. A smaller sample is needed for a sensitive test and a larger sample is needed for a less sensitive test. Other factors such as previous health history of the farm, cost, availability of specific tests, sampling sick fish can be applied to increase the probability of detection without necessarily increasing the numbers of fish sampled. 
This is a more intensive, structured, program of testing and monitoring which would enhance our hatchery's ability to provide quality fish to its customers.
The FHCP also requires regular inspections by a qualified veterinarian.

Our hatchery has always considered fish health to be a high priority. A new lab was constructed at Ausyfish in 2008. This lab is well equiped and has several microscopes, one having a camera fitted creating a good training tool for staff.

If required Ausyfish will supply a health certificate and (OR) AQIS certificate to customers with their deliveries of fish.

Click for video FHCP thumbnail

To date no OIE or quarantinable diseases have been detected.

viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER)

Viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) or infection by betanodavirus is present in Queensland with records of disease in barramundi, archerfish, and giant grouper (and several of the other groupers in experimental cultures) – marine systems.
There is one record of VER in 3 month old  sleepy cod in 1999.  While it was never definitively confirmed, the official investigation concluded the sleepy cod fingerlings probably picked up the infection from the holding tanks/RAS which had previously held a batch of barramundi.  This was a one-off incidence at this property.  Otherwise VER is not seen in freshwater fishes in Queensland.  This disease has never been detected at Ausyfish and, other than the one instance in sleepy cod, the disease has never been detected on any other freshwater farm/hatchery in Queensland.

VER is a reportable disease nationally so it is listed as restricted matter in the Queensland Biosecurity Act, and hatcheries and farmers are required report its occurrence to Biosecurity Queensland.  Biosecurity Queensland in turn report the occurrence of VER to the Department of Agriculture Water and Environment, so they can report it internationally to the OIE in Australia’s Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease report.

VER remains a significant issue for marine aquaculture in Australia and Asia.  In Australia, while known to occur in barramundi fry, the disease has no impact in farms/grow out.  It is different in giant grouper who seem to be susceptible at all ages (even >7 years old).  There are increasing reports of VER in freshwater fish species in Asia; apparently due to the common practise of co-culture of various species in the same hatchery.

Because Ausyfish fry are tested regularly under the Fish Health Certification Program, (FHCP) any of lesions in the brains or eyes would be found.  This is where the damage occurs in the infections with betanodavirus.  Also, under the FHCP we are obligated to properly investigate any clinical disease incident. If VER was to occur lesions would be detected on histopathology of the diseased fish.

Conditioning Brood Fish

  • Brood fish take a few years to mature. 
  • Males at BEST one year, but usually two years.
  • Females at BEST two years but usually three years.
  • Fish grown on pellets (Ones you get from another fish farm, or your own grow-out fish.) can take two or three years to produce "GOOD" eggs AFTER THE PELLET DIET IS STOPPED, AND THEY HAVE BEEN PLACED IN AN EARTH POND. Even though you might find many eggs inside them when you dissect, those eggs usually don't hatch, or the babies are poor quality and do not perform well in grow-out. This is not a hard and fast rule. This is about getting quality reliable spawns on a regular basis. It is possible to have grow-out fish give good spawns, but it is not reliable.
  • The best way to condition brood fish is to keep them in an earth pond. The bigger the pond the better. If there are some trees to give shade to the fish is also good, but not totally necessary.
  • They should not be fed aquaculture pellets regularly. It is best to feed them "natural" food. 
  1. Food should be live small shrimp.
  2. Vegetation, such as aquatic weed, algae, even leafy vegetables like lettuce leaves.
  3. Aquaculture pellets with low fat, and plant based protein can be fed once per week during winter, and twice per week during spring, summer, and autumn.
  4. They should not be stocked heavily. About 100 fish to a quarter acre pond. 
  5. As temperatures increase in spring food should be increased based on demand. The more they eat the more should be fed.
You should do what you can to start conditioning brood fish now. The sooner you start the sooner "reliable" successful spawning will start.
 

Kangaroo Syndrome

Under construction

 

Why I call it Kangaroo Syndrome, I refer to the lack of growth when silver perch are over stocked. When kangaroos overpopulate an area, or there is not enough feed available they will not become pregnant.

Does this happen to other species? Yes reference Rob Bob with jade perch. Also fighting at lower stocking levels. Disease issues etc.

 

WHY ?

Fish for a breeding program

SELECTIVE BREEDING OF JADE PERCH AND SILVER PERCH - 

Although we follow a similar process for silver perch, on this page we only focus on jade perch.

We have been breeding our jade perch every year for almost 30 years. 

Bigger size jades The fish on the left were selected from a harvest of 60,000 fry the size of those on the right. Jade perch fry Copy

From the very beginning we noticed that sometimes a few fish were much bigger than the rest of the fingerlings harvested from the pond. We call these fish "shooters" and keep them for future breeders.

 Barcooriversign Barcoo River Jade perch story part 3

Originally we collected our breeders from the wild, from the Barcoo River, under special government permit. We collected wild fish for about five years until we were able to access breeders from our customers in Australia, who grow our fry to table size. (The fish we produced from wild brood fish we call F1, first generation from wild.) We were/are able to access their fish at first harvest and select the biggest of the crop to use as breeders. We used their fish with the shooters we had grown on for breeding. This was working very well for years. However, we were alerted by our customers in Asian countries to issues regarding slow growing, deformities, and disease outbreaks experienced in fish thay had been buying from hatcheries in Asia. These were not our fry, but fry produced from shipments we had sent years earlier. Those hatcheries had been breeding from those fish for several generations. After making enquiries with scientists here in Australia, the consensus was that qualities the wild fish have were being lost after several generations of breeding from such a small gene pool. This is usually referred to as "inbreeding".

Wild jade perch, (scortum barcoo) come from an area in Australia that has very little rainfall. The red area in the map below is the Lake Eyre Basin. The only place in the world where wild jade perch occur. The fish we produced from wild brood fish we call F1. True F1 fry or fingerlings can only be supplied from Australia, because only Australian hatcheries have access to wild fish under special permit. Conditions on this special permit forbid the sale of fish collected from the wild. We are not even permitted to give them away. They can only be taken directly from the wild to the licenced hatchery named on the permit. Guaranteed F1 fry are available to order. Prices here

Road to Barcoo River Lake Eyre and Murray Darling Fitzroy Dawson basins Road to Barcoo River Great Dividing range

Often this area only has rain once a year, sometimes even several years without any rain or water flows. The rivers in this area dry up to just a few water holes. When there are water flows the water conditions can change in a few hours. Temperature, turbidity, PH, oxygen levels etc, change very quickly. Food which was scarce during the dry can explode, becoming abundant. In effect a real famine to feast situation occurs. The fish that live in these areas have adapted survival strategies that help them thrive in these hostile conditions. Very high water temperatures can be experienced in summer, and relatively low temperatures during winter. Food is in short supply. Dissolved oxygen can be very low. Water can become clearer between rainfall or water flow events. During water flows the water is extremely turbid. If you put your finger into the water you literally can't see the end of your finger.

Most fish species would die, either directly from the poor water quality during dry periods, or the sudden changes in water quality, or from disease as a result of prolonged stress.

During the famine phase, jade perch have evolved to survive. This makes them ideal for aquaculture. They survive poor water quality, lack of quality food, and have great disease resistance. All perfect qualities for aquaculture. They also grow extra quickly during the "feast" conditions. It is during the "feast" conditions that they need to grow fast so they can reproduce. Their growth during the "feast" time is quite remarkable. Again, a very desirable aquaculture quality. By the way, these conditions generally occur in the warmer months. They have the ability to compete with several other species that also share their environment. One unusual example of how other fish have developed survival strategies is a catfish that lives in the same water as the jade perch. There are several catfish that are native to these waters, one of them I call the eye eater. It will pluck the eyes from any fish nearby. I conclude this is a survival strategy that has evolved because a fish without eyes can't eat your food.

What happens during the "feast" time. Local heavy rainfall or water flows from hundreds of kilometers away flood the dry river bed and surrounding areas. This results in an explosion of phytoplankton which provides food to support an equally significant explosion of zooplankton. This is the bottom end of the food chain that will support higher life forms such as shrimp, aquatic insects, and so on. The larger items of the food chain are what the jade perch thrive on and grow extra fast. Then they can breed, while the water is flowing. When the eggs of the fish hatch, they need the bottom end of the food chain, the phytoplankton and the zooplankton. 

Wild fish go through harsh summer and winter periods, long dry times, and "feast" times. In aquaculture they are usually always in "feast" times. It appears that, over several generations they lose the ability to resist disease, and the fast growing qualities that they needed in the wild. They no longer need to survive like they did in the wild. Those good genes get lost. That's why we introduce a wild fish to our line bred fish to our gene pool, to keep those desired aquaculture qualities.


 

Harvest fry

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aquaculture consulting services.

Silver Perch

SILVER PERCH - High in Omega-3

Did you know how healthy silver perch fingerlings will be when they grow to table size?
They are a super food.Click here to find out more about just how healthy silver perch and jade perch are. They are full of healthy Omega-3. CSIRO tests* showed that Australian jade perch contained an incredible 2,483mg/100gm of omega-3 oils, and Australian silver perch had 792mg/100gms of omega-3. 

*This testing was conducted at the CSIRO Marine Research Laboratories, Hobart as part of an FRDC project 99/331. 

Silver perch fingerlings are an ideal fish for ponds and dams. Be sure to check that it is legal to put them in your dam first. Find more hereThey are also good for aquaponics in cooler climates where jade perch won't handle the winter water temperatures. When grown in tanks, silver perch fingerlings will grow to about 300 to 350 grams in about a year, given reasonable growing conditions. Unless it is a flow through system, then they will keep growing to reach about 500 to 800 grams in one and a half to two years. In Singapore they have grown to 1 kg in 12 months. That's because Singapore has a year round tropical climate.

Silver perch have been farmed commercially for decades. They are an ideal fish for growing in ponds and raceways. They will also grow in tanks, however some tank systems do not produce perfect results. For reasons not fully understood, some tank systems seem to result in a growth barrier at about 300-350 grams. For hobby backyard aquaponic systems this probably won't be a problem as 350 grams is still a good plate size whole fish. Back in 1916 silver perch were seen as a canderdate for aquaculture. In the early 1980's commercial production was trialed by the pioneers of a now well established industry. The species is now grown commercially in many countries around the world. The species is most popular in Asian countries. They have the potential to grow to about 6-8 kilos. (Depending on which scientist you speak to.) In Singapore I have seen them grow to 1 kg in 12 months. That's because Singapore has a year-round tropical climate. Silver perch have been farmed commercially for decades, and is now grown commercially in many countries around the world. Click the pictuere below to see the one kilo silver perch in Singapore.

Silver perch in Singapore    River basins

This is an Australian native species from the Murray Darling River Basin, the blue area in the map above. This is the largest river basin in Australia, covering a very large inland area of Australia with a broad climate range. Parts of the basin are quite arid. Temperature ranges are broad and water chemistry varies considerably. This all adds up to a sturdy fish that is not too demanding on the grower. Best results are achieved at optimum temperatures and water quality. A temperature range between 23C and 28C is best, but they will tolerate as low as *2C and as high as 37C. (*Fisheries Action Program Australian Department of Environment 2002.)

Professional growers achieve 600 to 800 grams in less than 18 months. This is in Australia, where winter pond temperatures result in much slower growth. They grow on a range of commercial diets, with a wide range of fat and protein contents. Silver perch are known to have very high levels of beneficial omega-3. Research has shown they have one of the highest levels of omega-3 in seafood tested by the CSIRO. It is noteworthy that the omega-3 content of the flesh will vary according to the diet used to grow the fish. This means they not only are an excellent table fish, but they are also very healthy to eat !

FOR THE FARM DAM

Silver Perch can be stocked at about 300-400 per hectare if they are not fed, and up to 1000 per hectare if you can feed them regularly. I recommended that, in dams, they be fed during the late afternoon. When the shadows are across the water. Feeding silver perch just before sunset will provide a spectacular display for your friends and visitors. A great talking point for a barbie.

Silver Perch are omnivorous and will thrive in most farm dams. Click here to see if you can stock them legally in Queensland You need to do your own research for other jurisdictions.

They will eat worms and most other aquatic life including weeds. Should you add fingerlings in the future the older fish are very unlikely to eat the new fingerlings. They readily take artificial food, such as aquaculture pellets, chook pellets or bread. Bread or chook foods are not the best of diets for fish but will do in small quantities. Aquaculture pellets are a properly balanced diet and fish will thrive on these commercially available foods.

As the Silver Perch soon come to know when they will be fed, they will be ready and waiting near the surface at feeding time. I recommend silver perch be fed during the late afternoon. When the shadows are across the water. If they are fed early in the morning there is a risk that birds may eat your fish before you are up and about, especially in summer when it is light very early. Remember the fish will be congregating in one spot waiting to be fed. Feeding silver perch just before sunset will provide a spectacular display for your friends and visitors. A great talking point for a barbie.

Silver Perch can be stocked at about 300-400 per hectare if they are not fed, and up to 1000 per hectare if you can feed them regularly.

Silver Perch that have been fed are very easy to catch, just add a hook to their food!? Otherwise use worms fished on the bottom with a very light float.

Silver Perch are excellent eating but can sometimes have a weedy or muddy flavour. It is best to hold live fish in very clean water for a week if the flavour is not pleasant. Alternatively, only take fish for eating from your dam during dry spells when there is no run-off into the dam, and water is clear, not muddy or green.

WHAT DO THEY LIKE

Temperature range 23C and 28C. They will tolerate as low as 2C, and as high as 37C.  PH. Best pH range between 6.5 and 9. Tolerate pH levels between 6 and 10  Salt Salinity levels of 5 grams per litre are safe.

Diet

Silver Perch are omnivorous and will thrive in most diets. Although they might eat fish that can fit in their mouth, they are not really considered serious predators. They will eat worms and most other aquatic life including weeds. Should you add fingerlings to a dam in the future the older fish are very unlikely to eat the new fingerlings. They readily take artificial food, such as aquaculture pellets. Aquaculture pellets are properly balanced diets that the fish will thrive on.

Disease Free Certification

FISH HEALTH CERTIFICATION PROGRAM (FHCP)

Our fingerlings come from a disease free certified hatchery.

The FHCP places the following fish health and biosecurity conditions to ensure that fish health management is consistently maintained by :

  1. Keeping of fish health records
  2. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for quarantine, disinfection, disease investigation, disease treatment and control
  3. Reporting of significant or notifiable diseases
  4. Regular veterinary inspection program of the facility

Our hatchery has been submitting samples to the Queensland Government Biosecurity Sciences Laboratory for health testing. These tests are comprehensive. They include gross, and histology examination, (histopathology) of each sample submitted. This is where the sample, (Usually about 30 fish from each batch or pond.) is sliced into ultra thin, transparent sections which are then examined under a microscope by a highly qualified Queensland Government fish pathologist.

These tests have been a requirement for batches of fish sent to aquaculture facilities outside the state of Queensland.

In 2010, our hatchery volunteered to participate in a new government scheme designed to better capture the health of fish at aquaculture facilitys. This new scheme developed by the Queensland Government, the Fish Health Certification Program, (FHCP) requires samples to be sent on a regular basis regardless of where the fish were to be sold.

The FHCP carries out regular disease surveillance testing by gross and histopathology performed by the Biosecurity Sciences Laboratory (BSL) of the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF-Qld), Queensland State Government. It also requires regular inspections by a qualified veterinarian.

This is a more intensive, structured, program of testing and monitoring which would enhance our hatchery's ability to provide quality fish to its customers.

To date no OIE or quarantinable diseases have been detected.

Our hatchery has always considered fish health to be a high priority. A new lab was constructed at Ausyfish in 2008. This lab has several microscopes, one having a camera fitted creating a good training tool for staff.

If required Ausyfish will supply a health certificate and (OR) AQIS certificate to customers with their deliveries of fish.

lab1

lab1

TABLE SIZE FISH

AUSTRALIA

It's not so easy to find jade perch in any retail outlet in any of the Australian cities. There is not enough production for it to be offered to the broader market. It's a long story, but essentially all these fish come from family businesses. Farms run by families. They are all making a good, secure living. It would be a big move, and risk, to jump to the "broarder market", supermarket outlets. The Asian community in our cities pretty much consume all the production. I personally have been looking into the option to have it delivered to "mum's" door. It's an obvious market, health conscious mum, or just generally health conscious people that want to eat this regularly. The best I can do at the moment is send it in a box lots, of whole, chilled jade, or silver perch, which you must collect from your local airport, and you collect it there. 

We would have to pack a minimum of 15kg. 
Freight is minimal, I can let you know exactly if you are interested. 
The fish will be $22 per KG. 
Shipping is every Tuesday and Wednesday. 
You can pick it up next morning. We can sometimes send on a direct Sydney flight to arrive in a couple of hours from packing, or a few more hours to Melbourne or Adelaide.
If you are interested please text my mobile: 0407 797 149. OR WeChat: BrucePerchMan
ASIA
If you need supply of table size fish in Asia, we know many growers in many countries.
We supply fry/fingerlings to many farms. Contact me if you want table ready jade perch.
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Members Area Content Perch Man

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WHAT IS IN THE MEMBERS AREA (Last updated October 15th 2021)

The following subjects are covered, some in great detail, in the members area of my website.

  • Detailed information on Australian golden perch
  • Detailed information on Australian honey perch
  • Detailed information on Australian silver perch
  • Detailed information on Australian bass
  • Detailed information on Australian sleepy cod
  • oxygen
  • Impostor fish looks like jade perch but it is a different species
  • Natural habitat of jade perch
  • Salt tolerance of jade perch
  • Co2 and jade perch
  • Best food for jade and silver perch
  • Disease manage of jade and silver perch
  • Water hardness and jade and silver perch
  • Water chemistry in natural habitat of jade perch and golden perch
  • Tape worm found in jade perch
  • Murray cod information centre
  • Golden rules for jade perch and silver perch farming
  • Videos, of lectures, of fish farms, methods for handling, and commercial production of Australian native freshwater fish species.
  • Grading jade perch because they DO EAT EACH OTHER
  • How to count your fish correctly
  • Commercial hatchery code of best practice
  • Sleepy cod weaning procedure
  • More useful information is being added regularly

HOW TO USE THE MEMBERS AREA

To access this area of the jadeperch web site click on "membership" on the top menu bar. Once you have signed up you will notice that the "membership" button on the menue bar now has a "Technical Information" drop down. Just click on Technical Information, and you are in. click for more

log in to members area on Jadeperch menu bar  log in to members area on Jadeperch menu bar close

Table fish direct to you

Want fish that are table size 

 Lyndans silver perch

It's no so easy to find jade perch in any retail outlet in any of the Australian cities. There is not enough production for it to be offered to the broader market. It's a long story, but essentially all these fish come from family businesses. Farms run by families. They are all making a good, secure living. It would be a big move, and risk, to jump to the "broarder market", supermarket outlets. The Asian community in our cities pretty much consume all the production. I personally have been looking into the option to have it delivered to "mum's" door. It's an obvious market, health conscious mum, or just generally health conscious people that want to eat this regularly. The best I can do at the moment is send it in a box lots, of whole, chilled jade, or silver perch, which you must collect from your local airport, and you collect it there. 

We would have to pack a minimum of 15kg. 
Freight is minimal, I can let you know exactly if you are interested. 
The fish will be $22 per KG. 
Shipping is every Tuesday and Wednesday. 
You can pick it up next morning. We can sometimes send on a direct Sydney flight to arrive in a couple of hours from packing, or a few more hours to Melbourne or Adelaide. Email me if you are interested: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
To see full size picture right click then open in new tab. CLICK HERE FOR PERCH RECIPES
Winning dish at AAQ cooking competition 2017 web size Jade perch whole

HONEY PERCH

Australian Honey Herch (Hephaestus fuliginosus)

Honey Perch are a popular sport fishing species found across the tropical regions of Australia. Abundant throughout coastal drainages of Northern Territory, Gulf of Carpentaria and North Eastern Queensland. Sports fisherman know them as sooty grunter. They are also known as black bream in some areas, however, there are many freshwater fish in Australia that local citizens call black bream. They have a white flaky flesh, with a delicate flavour considered by many people in Australia to be superior to other freshwater fish. The species will be new to aquaculture. Currently they are being trialed in Singapore, Malaysia and in Hong Kong the Inland Culture Development Section of the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department are conducting research on the species.

They readily accept commercial pellets. Even wild caught fish kept in tanks readily accept any food. Water temperatures should be in the range of 25 to 30c. They grow to about 54 centimeters and can weigh over 6kg. They can manage PH as low as 4.0 and temperature ranges between 11c and 35c. For best growth, maintain them between 25c and 30c. They are an Omnivorous speciesDiets that are suitable for jade perch, silver perch or tilapia would suit honey perch. Although, they are generally not aggressive towards each other, because this species has not yet been grown in intensive aquaculture systems, careful observation should be practiced to monitor any potential cannibalism or agressive behavour. As I always say, if it is small enough to fit in their mouth, it will probably end up in there !

We choose our breeders for their shape, and most important, their colour. We also use fish that are from east of the Great Dividing Range, and from the western side. The genetic difference may result in faster growth rates. Although, technically they are the same species, there is a very great historic distance between the two populations. This may well result in some (hybrid) growth vigor.

Very similar to khaki grunter but haslonger head profile. This can be seen in the picture below showing both species. When pelvic fins pressed against the body they don´t reach the anus as it does with the khaki grunter. 

Fry prices.

30 - 49       ---      $2.31 each  Inc GST

50  - 99    ---      $1.87 each  Inc GST

100 - 499  ---     $1.65 each  Inc GST

500 - 5000  ---   $1.43 including GST

First ever fry were shipped in February 2020. Order now for the 2020-21 season. Minimum order 10,000 fry at AUD$0.55 plus shipping costs. Limited numbers available. Orders will be supplied on a first ordered, first supplied basis. See video of fry here.

Shown below left is a honey perch with a Khaki perch. These fish were just caught in the wild and photographed immediately. To see full size pictures, right click and open in new tab. Below right are honey perch fry.

Khaki perch and honey Perch comparison weaned honey perch 1280x720

Below: Honey Perch and habitat To see full size pictures, right click and open in new tab.

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Habitat

Honey Perch habitat Honey perch habitat 2

Sleepy Cod (Oxyeleotris lineolata) General information

Soon Hock sleepy codAustralian sleepy cod (Oxyeleotris lineolata)

More information can be found in the "Members Area"

Sleepy cod table size ready to deliver NOW. 400 gram minimum size. AUD $33.00 each plus delivery to your door (Australia only), $44.00 per box, 10 fish per box. For overseas customers please contach Perch Man for a quote.  Contact The Perch Man for smaller quantities. Minimum quantity 2 fish. Freight and price available from The Perch Man.

20180316 190103 Copy Click picture for video

Weaned fingerlings are available. Weaned fingerlings that have been feeding on pellets are generally past the connibalistic phase, however if not stocked at high densities they will begin to eat each other again. Contact the Perch Man for availability and prices. Video showing weaned fingerlings here. 

sleepy cod fingerlings

 

 Video showing weaned fingerlings. 

Click picture for short video sleepy cod thumbnail Soon hock thumb nail

Below left: Young male Australian sleepy cod, ready to breed. Right: A very rare gold form of Australian sleepy cod.

NOTE: To view full size image, right click and open in new tab.

Young sleepy cod ready to breed Copy Rare gold sleepy cod Copy

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This page containes general information about sleepy cod. For more information go to the members area.

One of the most promising fish for future aquaculture. This fish has many qualities to give it all-round appeal as aquaculture species for the future.
It has been argued that this species has the best eating quality of all Australian freshwater fish.
Extremely easy to transport at high densities.
High flesh recovery.
Can be kept and grown in high densities.
Never have muddy flavour.

The Fitzroy/Dawson River strain, grow better than northern strain for aquaculture.
Recirculating systems necessary for grow-out.
Must be stocked at high densities.
High fat diets, (15-20%) undesirable as the fat damages the liver, this will affect FCR because the liver is an important part of the digestive system.
Placid and easy to handle.
Fitzroy/Dawson strain genetically distinct from northern strain.
Sleepy cod grow faster in tanks than in ponds
Males grow slower.
Best above 26C. Below 22C not recommended, with problems below 18C

They can produce huge numbers of eggs, up to at least 170,000 for larger fish! Information on breeding is available to clients. click here

COLOUR
The colour of sleepy cod can change according to environmental conditions. It is possible to manipulate their colour to provide fish to the market in a preferred colour. By this I mean lighter or darker, or even more marbled, but you can't change to the colours seen below, These are very rare. Temperature and light are other factors that effect the fishes colour. They are capable of changing colour within a few minutes.

Sometimes very rare colour forms of sleepy cod occur. These fish are only found in one or two streams in Queensland, and in the Pioneer River in the Kimberley region of Northern Australia. The ones from the Kimberley are a different species, (Oxeleotris selheimi) to those in Southern Queensland. We are breeding from these fish to develop more attractive colour forms. I have kept many of these "coloured" fish. Occasionally I have had one of these coloured fish actually change colour over weeks. The orange fish in the picture below changed to a marbled orange/brown fish over a couple of weeks. We continued to use it as a breeder because it had the orange gene.

(You can right click and open in new tab for full size picture.)

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The pictures below are of the Kimberley fish. This is a very rare catch made on 2020 by researchers. It was returned to the water unharmed.

Kimberley sleepy cod Oxeleotris selheimi 1 Kimberley sleepy cod Oxeleotris selheimi 2

Below, click for video. Left, large sleepy cod, right fingerling video.

sleepy cod link sleepy cod fingerlings

CULTURE METHOD

The sleepy cod is not suitable for free-range pond culture as they are highly carnivorous and cannibalistic, as well as very territorial. They are able to eat other sleepy cod fingerlings up to half their size. It is necessary to grade fingerlings regularly. It is also possible for the fish to stop feeding on the artificial diet if they are in an open environment. Best culture methods include, tanks (RAS), cages, raceways, and partitioned aquaculture systems (PAS). Weaned fingerlings can be supplied. Weaned fingerlings that have been feeding on pellets are generally past the connibalistic phase, however if not stocked at high densities they will begin to eat each other again. Contact the Perch Man for availability and prices.

AUSTRALIAN BASS - Macquaria novemaculeata

Australian bass is another native Australian species that shows promise as an aquaculture species.

It prefers cooler water but will tollerate tropical temperatures. Its flesh is white and flakey. It has a delisiously delicate flavour.

Grow-out trials are about to commence in some asian countries.

They will live in full sea water or completely fresh water. This makes many disease out breaks very easy to manage using as much salt as you like. Their natural range is from Bundaberg in Southern Queensland all the way down to Wilsons promontory, the southernmost tip of Victoria, and the southernmost part of Australia. They are found in the uppermost reaches of freshwater rivers and streams during summer, and move down to estuaries during winter. The oldest bass recorded was 47 years old. Australian bass vary in colour from metallic gold to greenish bronze. Their colour will change according to the surroundings. 

To order fry contact Perch Man This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

To see full size picture, right click on each picture and open in new tab.

Australian bass 6 Australian bass 13 Australian bass 14 Australian bass 15 Australian bass 16 Australian bass 12

Sleepy Cod (Oxyeleotris lineolata)

Sleepy Cod (Oxyeleotris lineolata)

The Perch Man, Bruce Sambell, was the first person to ever breed this species in captivity, and the first person to produce a commercial crop of fry/fingerlings. 

Our fingerlings are produced under a Fish Health certification Program

One of the most promising fish for future aquaculture because of its superior eating quality. This fish has many qualities to give it all-round appeal as aquaculture species for the future. It has been argued that this species has the best eating quality of all Australian freshwater fish.
Extremely easy to transport at high densities.
High flesh recovery.
Can be kept and grown in very high densities.
Early indications are that it will be unsuitable for pond grow-out situations, however it is ideal for growing in recirculating systems, cages and raceways.
In Asia there already exists a fish very similar to our Sleepy Cod. It is commonly known as the marble or sand goby (Oxyeleotris marmoratus). In restaurants across Asia it is known as "soon hock". It has become practice to cross the Australian and the Asian fish to take advantage of Hybrid vigour which apparently is excellent.

The marble goby is native to fresh and brakish waters. It can be found in Malaysia, Singapore, Cambodia, Thailand, Indochina, Philippines, and Indonesia. Asian sleepy cod are grown throughout South East Asia, particularly in Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam and are very popular in China. This fish fetches some of the highest prices, it is regarded as a top quality table fish. 
Shipping live, market sized Sleepy Cod, is relatively unchallenging. They do seem to live up to their name, “sleepy” and lay motionless in shipping bags. This means their use of oxygen is minimal and therefore production of CO2 low. Many large, live fish can be packed in a box.  
Experienced hatcheries have no difficulty producing fingerlings, however they are one of the more time consuming species to produce, with a low larval to fingerling survival rate, and therefore they are an expensive fingerling. 
 DSCF0251 Copy DSCF0250 Copy Coloured sleepy cod thumb nail

Pictured above, is of a wild caught orange fish. This orange form is extremely rare in nature. Research conducted by the Walkamin Research Facility in Far North Queensland was not been able to reproduce this colour in commercial quantities. All off spring are brown until they reach approximately 120-150 mm. About 5% of offspring had orange blotches, mostly about the head. Only 2-3% attains full colour. This research has been suspended.
Walkamin Research Facility also conducted growth trials so see if there were any particular populations of this fish that performed better as a grow-out fish. This preliminary work did show that the northern strain have a different appearance and are much stockier than the southern strain. Pond reared fish, at 200 mm, the northern strain was 163 gms, while the southern was 137 gms. However the population from the Fitzroy-Dawson* catchments, did grow faster in captive conditions, on artificial feeds. (Brett Herbert AAQ Conference 2001.)
 * The Dawson River flows into the Fitzroy River. The Fitzroy River flows into the sea at Rockhampton. This population is well south of the nearest northern populations.
Summary of research as presented by the research scientist Brett Herbert, at the AAQ Conference 2001

The Fitzroy/Dawson River strain, grow better than northern strain for aquaculture.
Recirculating systems necessary for grow-out.
Must be stocked at high densities.
High fat diets, (15-20%) undesirable as the fat damages the liver, this will affect FCR because the liver is an important part of the digestive system.
Placid and easy to handle.
Fitzroy/Dawson strain genetically distinct from northern strain.
Sleepy cod grow faster in tanks than in ponds
Males grow slower.
FCR 0.68-1.38
Best above 26C. Below 22C not recommended, with problems below 18C


Notes:
COMMERCIAL GROWING

The sleepy cod is not suitable for free-range pond culture as they are highly carnivorous and cannibalistic, as well as very territorial. They are able to eat other sleepy cod fingerlings up to half their size. It is necessary to grade fingerlings regularly. It is also possible for the fish to stop feeding on the artificial diet if they are in an open environment. Cannibalism is almost nonexistent from about 10cm, providing stocking densities are maintained, and they are well fed.

  • Stocking density - 30kg per 1,000 ltr (Ref. Dr Richard Tan)
  • Time to 400 grams about two years. 
  • Temperature above 25c is best.
  • FCR 1- 1.1

TEMPERATURE
They are very temperature tolerant. We have recorded temperatures in our ponds with brood fish, and small fingerlings, as low as 9c and as high as 35c. (We do not recommend handling them at low temperatures.) We routinely have broodstock in ponds during winter at temperatures as low as 14C and sometimes as low as 11C. During these cold times we are not able to handle these fish and do sometimes experience minor losses. At temperatures above 14C we do not experience any difficulties. We only stock Fitzroy/Dawson species, Oxyeleotris lineolata.

They are very hardy and handle well, but do not handle well if temperatures are below 18c. Transport is easy as they live up to their name, "sleepy cod," and sit motionless in shipping containers. This results in low oxygen demand, and low ammonia production. Packing densities for fingerlings are still being researched, but they should be very economical to ship live, packed densely, with a minimum amount of water. Adult table fish are shipped in individual bags with little or NO WATER. They arrive alive and healthy. I have had them arrive 50 hours after packing without any problems.

WEANING
Fingerlings are easily weaned. Our fingerlings are not weaned as we believe it is better to ship the fingerlings soon after harvesting when they are in peak condition. They are raised in plankton ponds where they feed on natural food. We also believe that when weaned, then shipped, the stress results in a loss of confidence by the fingerlings in eating artificial food. They then need to be re-trained on to artificial food. The natural diet of sleepy cod is carnivorous. They feed on fish, freshwater shrimp and freshwater crayfish. They will therefore do best on a high protein diet similar to barramundi.

WEANING SLEEPY COD

Fingerlings are easily weaned. Our fingerlings are not weaned as we believe it is better to ship the fingerlings soon after harvesting when they are in peak condition. They are raised in plankton ponds where they feed on natural food. We also believe that when weaned, then shipped, the stress results in a loss of confidence by the fingerlings in eating artificial food. They then need to be re-trained on to artificial food. The natural diet of sleepy cod is carnivorous. They feed on fish, freshwater shrimp and freshwater crayfish. They will therefore do best on a high protein diet.

Sleepy cod are easy to wean to commercial aquaculture food.First feed them plenty of frozen blood worms. Once they are all eating frozen blood worms and are fat and healthy start the following process. Watch the ammonia in the tank during this process.

Using a kitchen blender make a thick juicy paste from some frozen blood worms. Soak some pellets in the juice. Mix the pellets with the frozen blood worms with your hands. Use gloves. Over a period of days, reduce the amount of frozen blood worms, until you end up with pellets that have all been soaked. Then over a period of several days, reduce the amount of juice, until they are only dry pellets. Take time to do this so the fish are gradually converted from the frozen blood worms to completely dry pellets. 50% floating, 50% sinking pellets are best. NOTE: Use frozen brine shrimp for golden perch, and frozen blood worms for sleepy cod. Click for video on this process
COLOUR
The colour of sleepy cod can change according to environmental conditions. it is possible to manipulate their colour  to provide fish to the market in a preferred colour. Temperature and light are the factors that effect the fishes colour. They are capable of changing colour within a few minutes. Below are some examples of their ability to display a range of colours. These fish were all taken from the same pond at the same time. See examples of colour below. Right click and open in new window for full size picture.
Different colour sleepy cod on mat Sleepy cod marbled Arm full of adult sleepy cod Sleepy con on arm Two sleepy cod colours changing Sleepy cod three colours 100 4520 Medium sleepy Pair of sleepy cod

SEXING

The papilla on females is broarder and fater. The male papilla is thin and pointed. To view full size picture, Right click and open in new window or tab.

Male sleepy cod male sleepy cod against finger male sleepy cod Left: MALE SLEEPY COD 

Female sleepy cod Female sleepy cod Left: FEMALE SLEEPY COD

 

WEANING GOLDEN PERCH

For positive results based on "The Perch Man's" method see the members area of this website.

The following information is the results of research by Brett Herbert, research scientist for the Queensland Fisheries Department. The work was done at Freshwater Fisheries and Aquaculture Centre Walkamin Far North Queensland, Australia. It should be noted that the variety of golden perch used for the weaning trials were not from the Lake EyreSystem. 

  

The following details the method we have used to wean golden perch fingerlings.  You may find it of use if you are to wean fish this year.  Our survival rates in mass rearing have been good, with up to 98% survival. Fingerlings 20-25mm total length do well, using a 1mm skretting salmon crumble starter diet. The Ridley’s starter diet is too big. If you get bigger fish a bigger crumble could be used, but 1mm will get you through.  It is best to have all the blocks made up beforehand. We work on about 50-60mL plankton slurry  per 1000 fish.

Our most successful method to date is as follows:

  1. On receipt of fingerlings feed frozen plankton, until fish are through transport shock, quarantine, and prophylactic treatments are completed.  This may take up to a week (usually a couple of days).  Advised treatment is 70ppm formalin with 10‰ salt for one hour.  The fish must be watched carefully for the duration of the treatment and strong aeration maintained.
  2. Start feeding frozen blocks of plankton slurry.  We habituate the fish to being fed in a specific place in the tank at specific times.  We feed three times a day.  Water and aeration are turned off so there is no current in the tank. Frozen blocks are placed in a plastic mesh basket (gutter guard or similar), hung on the side of the tank at the water surface. Plastic mesh is about 10mm2.  The cover of the tank is pushed back a little on each feeding occasion as the fish don’t like bright light.  The amount of food required is determined by observing the amount of plankton left circulating in the water thirty minutes or so after feeding. It is important to know how much they eat so as not to feed to excess during weaning.
  3. Fish were observed feeding.  Once the majority of fish were rising to the blocks and actively feeding, the weaning process began.
  4. Frozen blocks of plankton/crumble mix (we use 1mm skretting salmon starter crumble) replace the plankton blocks.  The ratio of plankton: crumble  is reduced by 10% each day.  We use volume to measure, starting with 10% crumble to 90% plankton, reducing plankton and increasing crumble by 10% each day. Use a slurry of plankton. The higher proportions of crumble mix will be dryish, do not add water when mixing as if you do it stays in a lump and does not fall though the mesh.  It also fouls the water very quickly if too wet.    Over mixing makes it go to a gooey paste which does not work. It is best to mix the fresh, chilled plankton with the crumble. Do not freeze the plankton and thaw it for mixing. If the mix is dry and unlikely to hold together (usually only the 80% and 90% crumble mixes are like this) you can add water after the mix is partly frozen, and then freeze it completely. That way you are not mixing water and crumble excessively, and it will behave well.
  5. Weaning takes 9 days.  The crumbles are then fed by sprinkling on the surface in the same place as the basket was.  Observe the fish-they should still be coming in to this area to feed.  We continue feeding crumble alone for two weeks during which most non-feeders will die off.

Notes:

Artemia could be substituted for plankton if desired.  However, Artemia fouled the water more quickly than plankton.

Cleaning on a daily basis by scrubbing the tanks is essential.  Flushing just after feeding is essential due to the fouling effect of the moistened frozen crumbles. Plankton-crumble mixes of 50-80% crumble foul the water worst.

The plankton size should be <1mm and >200mm (for 25-35mm fingerlings).  Our plankton of this size was primarily Moina, juvenile Daphnia, and copepods. We make the mixes up each morning with the fresh plankton. We chill it first so it is cold and use crumble stored in the freezer. The final mixes (80 and 90% crumble) will probably not hold together, add water in the mould when freezing. Put the mesh bag in and then sprinkle the crumbly mix above the bag.  Only mix until the plankton and fish food are well combined-too much mixing and the fish food goes like mud. It will not break up and fall through the basket.

The plankton slurry is a consistency that will hold its shape for a short while-if you take out a spoonful and place it on top of the slurry it will gradually sink in. If it disappears straight away it is too thin. Likewise, if a spoon stands up in the slurry it is too thick. 

Introduction of fish into ponds where any other food source is available may result in the fish going back to alternative food.  We have fish in cages in ponds feeding on artificial food.  

All attempts at weaning fish “cold turkey”, with or without presence of weaned ‘trainer fish’ were unsuccessful.  We had a maximum survival rate of 20%.  We did find that these fish grew as fast as the best of the weaned fish.  This suggests that possibly some fish are predisposed to eating whatever is available, and these are the fastest growing.

If you have any questions, or would like to clarify any points on the above, do not hesitate to contact us. (Contact details at the bottom of this page)

Growth of Fingerlings.

From a start weight after weaning of about 1g, fish grow to an average of about 12-14g after three months. In our ponds, 28-64% of fish were less than 10g at three months.  I suggest grading at this point. I will not predict what level you might have, with any luck it will be at the lower end.

With a starting average weight of  about 15-20g after grading, another grade could be done after about 4 more months. By this time there should be a clear distinction between the non-performers and the racers. Our results had about 20% of these fish not performing (i.e. only 20-40g four months after grading).

Food For The Fish.

We have only found one supplier who reliably supplies a sinking pellet. Skretting has sinking barramundi and salmon diets. There is no difference in the crumbles.

Primo is importing a fish food, which has a low fat content and may be better for the fish.  We have tried it and found that it floated.

Golden perch feed on the bottom for several hours after feeding.  If possible, adjust circulation to retain pellets in raceway for as long as possible. In your water their feeding behaviour might be different.

Pellet size is dependent on the size of the fish. You may find that you need to use different sizes of pellet to those recommended here.  Do not change over pellet sizes abruptly, as some fish choke to death on the larger pellets if you do. By monitoring left over feed you will see if certain size pellets are no longer being eaten.

Amount of Food.

 We have found this relies on the quality of the food, but is quite variable.  Food consumption will have to be monitored carefully and adjusted regularly.

In our experience, golden perch food consumption does not drop as temperatures drop. (Your temperatures being considerably lower may reduce food consumption).

 *This is in ponds. Monitor feeding closely. We found that the midday feed stopped increasing after about two months and then fish stopped eating at midday.  Likewise, after about 4 months the morning feed was less used and could be dropped. 

Golden perch feed table

 Note: These average sizes are based on our removal of 50% of smaller fish in our ponds. As we had up to 64% of fish in the small size classes, some of our ‘large fish’ ponds have a substantial number of smaller fish in them, which pulls down the average.

GOLDEN PERCH

Our fingerlings are produced under a Fish Health certification Program

Golden perch are ONLY found in Australia.

Gloden perch video link

There are three species of Golden Perch. Macquaria ambigua ambigua, Macquaria ambigua oriens, Macquaria Sp.

Lake Eyre golden perch Female Dawson River golden perch Golden perch from the Murray Darling at the top and the Fitzroy Dawson at the bottom River Basins
Lake Eyre golden perch Female Dawson River golden perch Golden perch from the Murray Darling at the top and the Fitzroy Dawson at the bottom River Basins

 

The one from the Murray Darling River Basin is Macquaria ambigua ambigua.

Tip for images. Right click and open in new tab for full size image.

Below the Murray River

Murray 50 Murray River 50

The species from the Fitzroy Dawson river Basins is, Macquaria ambigua oriens.

Below the Dawson River

Dawson River 50 Dawson River 75

The species from the Lake Eyre Basin has not yet been described. It is simply known as Macquaria sp.

Below the Thompson River. Part of the Lake Eyer Basin.

Thompson River muddy habitat 50  Thompson river a muddy coloured habitat 50

Lake Eyre and Murray Darling Fitzroy Dawson basins

This map shows the three river basins

BLUE: Murray/Darling Basin

RED: Lake Eyre Basin

YELLOW: Fitzroy/Dawson Basin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More reading on golden perch species:    

Macquaria ambigua ambigua:   Link 1 Link 2

Macquaria ambigua oriens: Link 1 Link 2

The Lake Eyre Basin Maquaria sp: Link 1 Link 2 Link 3 

About Lake Eyre: Lake Eyre is a large, usually dry salt pan in the South Australian Outback. Actually, it is Australia's largest salt lake in a dry and isolated environment.  It actually consists of two lakes, Lake Eyre North (8 430 km²) and Lake Eyre South (1 260 km²), connected by Goyder Channel which has a length of 15 km. The huge salt lake is the terminal point of Australia's largest drainage system, the Lake Eyre basin. The lake is also Australia's lowest point with 15,2 m below sea level in Belt Bay and Madigan Gulf.The main tributaries into the lake are the rivers in south-west Queensland, the Diamantina and Georgina river systems and Cooper Creek. Although these rivers flow quite frequently, they hardly reach Lake Eyre. 1990, Cooper Creek reached the lake for the first time in more than 20 years. It took another 20 years until the Cooper made it to the lake again. Western tributaries are the Neales and Macumba rivers. In 1984 and 1989 the western tributaries filled Lake Eyre South within a few days. Finally, the water overflowed to Lake Eyre North. This is recorded a very rare event, as usually the northern lake fills first, and overflows the southern part. It is a fact that the lake had only filled to its full capacity three or four times within the last 150 years. 

lake eyre

Early trials in RAS and raceways has produced positive results for the Lake Eyre species of golden perch, but not very good results for the Murray/Daring species. The Lake Eyre System drains from Queensland to South Australia where it dries up at Lake Eyre. This is a very difficult environment for any animal, particularly fish. This river basin, is also the natural habitat of jade perch. Survival in this hostile river system is only possable for species with special survival stratigies. 

The first commercial supplies of golden perch fingerlings were supplied to grow-out farms in Australia were from the Lake Eyre strain. These fish have shown excellent growth. One grower reports that they grow much faster than silver perch. This grower is using large round polly tanks. In his words the fish are described as "..the barramundi of the inland..".
After 40 days the fish had grown from about 1gm to an average size of 25gm. The fish were graded into three average sizes, 50gm, 24gm and 12gm. One fish was 112gms.
After 75 days they are estimated to be an average of 40-50 gm. This is an estimate as the water temperature was 14-15C, and handling was considered an unnecessary risk at this relative low temperature. This grower says they eat actively at 15C, and at 12C still feed but not so eagerly.
After  100 days the average of the larger fish was 108gms. The largest fish was now just over 200gms. The average of the fish in the medium size range, (which is now two thirds of the population) is 80gms. The grower reports that they have gone from 20gms to 80gms in only two months! The FCR, (food conversion rate) over the range of sizes is between .8 and 1.7 to 1 This is using dry food.
Care should be taken when handling golden perch. The fish have small scales and are softer to the touch. When handled for grading or other management tasks, extra care should be taken not to cause any physical damage to the fish.
Golden perch is a native Australian fish. It is marketed as callop or yellowfin perch. The Australian market was supplied by wild caught fish, however all these licences and permits to harvest these fish from the wild have been discontinued. When the fish were available from wild harvest, Gilled and gutted fish 500g to 1 kg, (up to 4 kg) sold for AUD$9-16 per kg at Sydney fish markets. Quantities sold annually varied greatly. Sydney fish market figures were 200 tonnes cleared on the auction floor in 1993, and 4 tonnes in the first half of 1996. Market analysts believe that the total quantity sold in Sydney and Melbourne were at least four times that sold on the Sydney fish market. This indicates that the Australian domestic market can accept large quantities (ie 800 tonnes) of the product.

Below: Golden perch fingerlings, Lake Eyre.

Lake Eyre fingerlings 

"Review of Golden Perch Aquaculture at Department of primary Industries Walkamin facility."

NOTE: This government research was completed in 2003 and may be out-of-date with industry experience)

Below contains extracts of information taken from the AAQ Conference 2004, presentation by Dr. Brett Herbert.

Dr. Brett Herbert

Profitable Aquaculture Systems

Queensland Department of Primary Industries

Freshwater Fisheries and Aquaculture Centre

Walkamin

STRAINS

  • Three strains of golden perch in Australia.
  • Most commonly grown and sold are Murray-Darling (M-D) strain.
  • The Fitzroy subspecies (Central Queensland) is darker than the M-D strain.
  • The Lake Eyre basin species is longer and thinner, and is generally more silver than the M-D strain.

MARKET

Colour manipulation

  • As colour is important we tried making fish paler.
  • Using kaolin clay or holding in dark conditions did lighten the colour.
  • Over three days they darkened.
  • A light coloured chill bin produced lighter coloured fish closer to wild ones.
  • Lighter colour produced in turbid water.
  • Aquaculture golden perch received a slight premium on wild caught when gill & gut taken into account.
  • Market prefers cleaned fish.
  • Lighter colour produced in turbid water.
  • Market of up to 1000t/year. (Sydney/Melbourne), although recently  400T.

Purging

  • Tank purging resulted in significant weight loss (10%) over one week.
  • In pond purging (no feeding for four days) prior to harvest.
  • All ponds sampled before purging started with at least three women involved each time.

Weaning

Fish which did not wean successfully die off after 10-20 days.

  • Weaning success is usually 90-95%.
  • Small fish (0.15g,19mm) wean as well as larger fish (0.5g,32mm)  

Nursery

  • Grading does not appear to be strictly necessary.
  • About 50% of fish will not perform in aquaculture.
  • These fish do not eat pellet food but do cost in oxygen and ammonia etc.

Grow out

  • Sex ratios –males dominate (60%)
  • Females split into two groups-ones that don’t grow and ones that grow.
  • Body shape significantly different after 150g (♀ heavier).
  • Female growth slower initially but catch up at about 6-9 months.
  • Juvenile ♀ were more susceptible to handling stress.
  • When an average size of 600g+ is achieved, pond is ready to harvest.
  • Fish sizes will range from 350g to 1kg+ (90%>450g).
  • This takes from 14-18 months.
  • Grow out from 200g to market size is relatively quick.
  • Temperatures >15°  100g per month is achieved, sometimes more

Conclusions

  • Feed a sinking pellet, 40% protein.
  • Monitor feeding closely-size, quality, regularity.
  • Maintain water quality.
  • Realise that only 50% of fish may grow, bank on 30%.
  • Sample product before harvest! (Taste)

Click here for weaning golden perch

Water Quality Measurements Jade perch and Golden Perch Habitat

General information collected, and observations from the natural habitat of jade perch, and the Lake Eyre strain of golden perch.

Lake Eyre Basin

 Map source

More on Golden Perch

On a trip to the Barcoo River in July 2014 the following water quality measurements were taken;   Temperature at surface 14.6C Two meters below the surface 14c.  Hardness. General hardness 51ppm carbonate hardness 40ppm. PH 7.4. Conductivity less than 200. Ammonia 0. 

On a trip to the Thompson River in August 2018 the following water quality measurements were taken; (Note, the Thompson River is very close to the Barcoo River. It is part of the same system that drains into the Lake Eyre Basin.   Temperature Taken at 4 sites. At 1 meter 18c At the surface 19c. Note, it was quite windy every day. There was considerable wave action which might explain the reduced difference between 1 meter and surface temperatures.  Hardness. General hardness 50ppm. PH 7.7. Conductivity less than 200. Ammonia 0. Dissolved oxygen 9.7 Salt Measured with a refractometer, 0.

Both the Barcoo, and the Thompson Rivers are a series of water holes that only experience water flows about every 4 or 5 years. Their waters are very muddy. Gennerally, if you placed your hand in the water, you cannot see the tips of your fingers because of the suspended clay in the water.

For full size images, right click, then open in new tab. Also see video links; 

Jade Perch Story part 1

Jade Perch Story part 2

Jade perch story part 3

Below: Thompson River

Thompson river a muddy coloured habitat 50 Thompson River muddy habitat 50

Below: Dawson River

Dawson River 75  Dawson River 50

Below: Barcoo River

Barcoo river 50 Barcoo 50

Below: Murray river

Murray 50 Murray River 50

For full size images, right click, then open in new window.

Micro Chip Management of Brood Fish

Quality fingerlings don't just happen.

Our fingerlings are produces under a Fish Health certification Program

Quality fry/fingerlings are the result of good brood fish management. We produce fish, specificly for grow out farms. For over a quarter of a century we have been line breeding our fish. Selecting for desirable qualities such as body shape, disease resistance, spots, and of course, fast growers. Our breeders have been selected each season from fish obtained from our fingerling customers in Australia and our own "super shooters", and fresh wild fish. That is many generations of line bred fish!

No hatchery anywhere has this history of line breeding Australian perch !

The fish we select from our Australian fingerling customers have been chosen from the first harvest of grow-out ponds. This means, we chose, usually about 50 fish from the very biggest of the pond being harvested, for the first time. That is, 50 out of thousands of fish. We also keep some fish from our own fingerling ponds. These particular fish are exceptional growers. I call them "super shooters." When we stock one of our ponds with larvae to grow on to fry for our customers, there are often a couple of fish that stand out. The pond harvest is tens of thousands of fish, and 2 to 5 of these fish are outstanding. The average weight of the fish being harvested may be about .3 of a gram, but these super shooters weigh many grams each. Hundreds of times bigger than the other fish in the pond.

We also, under special permit, collect fresh wild fish to prevent our fish from becoming, inbred. We do this under advice from scientists and geneticists. They are the experts, and they advise us that if we don not introduce fresh wild genes we may find issues developing in our fingerlings and fry. Issues such as physical deformities, poor disease resistance, poor growth perfomance. Poor growth performance may manifest itself in a number of ways. Slow growth over the entire grow-out phase, or poor growth performance after the fish reach a certain size. For example, fish may reach 500 grams quickly, but do not reach 800 - 850 grams as quickly as they did in earlier generations of fish. Australian growers reported, very early in the history of the perch grow-out in Australia, that it was easy to grow fish from 500 grams to 800 grams. They reported that this is where the easy profit was to be made. That is not the case now, with some farms. Those farms find that the fish growth slowed noticeable after 500 grams. This can be common in some species of fish. Take tilapia for example. This species can stunt readily. They have been commonly reported to become reproductive at a very small size, with very slow growth performance. This should be taken as a warning that inattention to genetic management can and does result in catastrophic loss of profit to grow-out farms.

Another vital consideration not to be underestimated, is the great advantage perch have to grow and survive in hostile conditions. This is particularly relevant for jade perch. Their natural environment is far from perfect. To survive and grow in the wild, these fish must possess genetic qualities that make it possible to survive and thrive in such impossible conditions. This is one of the reasons we regularly introduce "wild" genes" from wild breeders collected from the Barcoo River. This helps to maintain these desirable qualities in our fry. Disease resistance, body shape, colour, and spots are the "aquaculture" qualities we need to maintain. Read more about our breeding program

Click to see the Barcoo River for yourself. Barcoo River Click to see how we collect wild breeders Catching wild jade perch in the Barcoo River

 

One of the important ways we manage our genetics is the use of micro chips. Breeders are micro chipped so we can identify individual fish. We know exactly which fish were the parents of every batch of fry/fingerlings.

We have enhanced our management of brood fish to avoid inbreeding. Other countries have experienced inbreeding issues which have resulted in the loss of disease resistance, and slow growth rates over 500 grams. Spots have also been lost by some hatcheries. We have been line breeding for over 25 years. Wild fish are introduced into the blood line at intervals to maintain the desirable qualities jade perch inherit from their ancestors. Scientists have advised us that we need to introduce wild genes to avoid loosing the special qualities that are so desirable in jade perch, such as fast growing, and disease resistance. Spots are something we have recently been selecting for because of requests from Asian customers.

microchip jpg See this YouTube video

What is a microchip?
Microchips, or PIT tags, Passive Integrated Transponders, are used for identification of individual fish.

They are inserted under the skin or into the muscle of the fish, usually next to the dorsal fin. They are inserted using a, single use, special applicator. The micro chips do not interfere with an animal’s normal functions. This process is carried out while the fish is anesthetized. Anaesthesia is recommended for the safety of the fish as struggling during handling can result in injury to the fish and the person inserting the chip.

micro chip applicater

A microchip is a small electronic device about the thickness of a ball point pen refill, and about 12mm long.

Micro chip

Each microchip contains a silicon chip that is encoded with an individual number. The components are sealed in biocompatible glass which renders the chip inert when implanted into an animal. To read the number, a scanner is moved over the implanted microchip and a signal passes between the chip and the scanner. The scanner translates the signal and displays it on a screen as a number. 

Prior to implantation, the implant site is swabbed with dilute antiseptic (e.g. Betadine or alcohol). We inserted the chips on the left side at the base of the dorsal fin. Glass chips should not be used if there is any chance the fish may be used for human consumption. 
Tissue glue is used to seal the insertion site. 

 

 


References
Australian code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes (8th Edition 2013). 

SILVER PERCH FINGERLINGS

SILVER PERCH FINGERLINGS

Our fingerlings are produces under a Fish Health certification Program

65 thousand fingerlings underwater

BUY SILVER PERCH FINGERLINGS
Follow the simple steps on how to order silver perch fingerlings. When you follow these steps you will send an email to our shipping department. The questions asked will help us email you the price of your silver perch fingerlings delivered to you. You can also order food and test kits to help you grow your silver perch fingerlings into a tasty, healthy meal. Just follow the links How To Order silver perch fingerlings and we will give you a quote before you commit to buy. We recommend advance orders for all quantities over 5,000

Did you know how healthy silver perch fingerlings will be when they grow to table size?
They are a super foodClick here to find out more about just how healthy silver perch and jade perch are. They are full of healthy Omega-3. CSIRO tests* showed that Australian jade perch contained an incredible 2,483mg/100gm of omega-3 oils, and Australian silver perch had 792mg/100gms of omega-3. 

*This testing was conducted at the CSIRO Marine Research Laboratories, Hobart as part of an FRDC project 99/331. 

Silver perch fingerlings are an ideal fish for ponds and dams. Be sure to check that it is legal to put them in you dam firstFind more hereThey are also good for aquaponics in cooler climates where jade perch won't handle the winter water temperatures. When grown in tanks, silver perch fingerlings will grow to about 300 to 350 grams in about a year, given reasonable growing conditions. Unless it is a flow through system, then they will keep growing to reach about 500 to 800 grams in one and a half to two years.

Our fingerlings are produces under a Fish Health certification Program

ALL SILVER PERCH ARE POND WEANED TO ARTIFICIAL FEED

3kg silver perch

AVERAGE SIZE  4-5cm MINIMUM ORDER 30. For smaller quantitiesclick here

How to order silver perch fingerlings  
30 - 50     ---      $2.31 each  Inc GST
51  - 100  ---      $1.87 each  Inc GST
101 - 500 ---      $1.65 each  Inc GST
501 - 5000  ---   $1.43 including GST
Over 5,000 POA. For larger quantities special freight arrangements will be made

We recommend advance orders for all quantities over 5,000
WHOLESALE PRICES OVER 10,000 AUD$0.43 each, 1.0 - 3.5 cm FRY.
Taking orders now for bulk quantities for 2018-19 season. Don't miss out. Production is limited.Terms and conditions.

  How to order silver perch fingerlings  

Did you want fish to manage mosquito wrigglers.click here

Perch On The Table

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE?

1.     The price of fry between Jade Perch, Silver Perch and Sleepy Cod

Jade and silver perch fry are the same price. Sleepy cod price varies from season to season, depending success of breeding.

 2.     The growth rate between Jade Perch, Silver Perch and Sleepy Cod.

Sleepy cod are slower growers than the perch. Little or no, commercial figures are available for this species. They perform best in tropical conditions. In Australia winter temperatures result in very slow growth. I am told by my clients in China that they have achieved quite good growth in RAS at high temperatures.

Jade perch compered to silver perch. Jade perch grow very fast in tropical conditions. Much faster than silver perch. In a tropical climate, my best guess would be that jade perch would be about 1kg in about 10 months. Silver perch about 1kg in 12 months. Market size in Australia is generally about 800 grams.

3.     The meat quality between Jade Perch, Silver Perch and Sleepy Cod.

Silver and jade perch have different fat content. Westerners prefer the silver perch because it is less fatty. Asian taste prefer jade perch because of the flavour of the fat. In fact, one of my clients in Hong Kong told me silver perch does not have enough flavour. He prefers the blend of fat and lean meat which gives it its distinctive flavour and texture. Personally I like both, but the silver perch does have a more delicate flavour. Sleepy cod are quite different to the perch. They have very little fat in their meat. The flesh is more flaky than perch. It has been compered to high end reef fish. It is generally considered to be the best freshwater table fish in Australia.

4.     The market acceptance in Australia between Jade Perch, Silver Perch and Sleepy Cod.

All of these species have enjoyed market acceptance to the point that there is never enough production to meet demand. The supply has been almost exclusively absorbed by the Asian community in Sydney and Brisbane, with Melbourne only receiving a trickle of production. The production of these fish in Australia is from relatively small family business. These businesses have been steadily increasing production as their business model has allowed. No major cooperate investment has occurred. Supermarkets chains have not been able to find significant, reliable, long term supplies.

Hints and recipes for jade and silver perch

Want fish that are table size 

It's no so easy to find jade perch in any retail outlet in any of the Australian cities. There is not enough production for it to be offered to the broader market. It's a long story, but essentially all these fish come from family businesses. Farms run by families. They are all making a good, secure living. It would be a big move, and risk, to jump to the "broarder market", supermarket outlets. The Asian community in our cities pretty much consume all the production. I personally have been looking into the option to have it delivered to "mum's" door. It's an obvious market, health conscious mum, or just generally health conscious people that want to eat this regularly. The best I can do at the moment is send it in a box lots, of whole, chilled jade, or silver perch, which you must collect from your local airport, and you collect it there. 

We would have to pack a minimum of 15kg. 
Freight is minimal, I can let you know exactly if you are interested. 
The fish will be $22 per KG. 
Shipping is every Tuesday and Wednesday. 
You can pick it up next morning. We can sometimes send on a direct Sydney flight to arrive in a couple of hours from packing, or a few more hours to Melbourne or Adelaide. Email me if you are interested: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(HINT. To view full size images on this page, right click and open image in new tab.)

Click here to find more recipies

This recipe won the Aquaculture Association of Queensland 2018 cooking competition

Prep time 20 minutes. Cook time 25 minutes

Ingredients

1 kg Sushi rice
1 bottle Sushi seasoning
4 Jade Perch fillets
2 cups mirin
Japanese rice wine condiment
2 cups light soy sauce
Preferably Japanese style
1 cup Brown Sugar

Instructions
1:cook sushi rice according to packet instructions. Then add sushi seasoning and cool on flat tray. Place weights on rice to make a firm even rectangle and chill.
2: Combine mirin, soy sauce and sugar in a pan and reduce by half.
3: Carefully fillet your Jade perch remove all pin bones and de-scale.
4:Place Jade perch fillet on grill, BBQ or in frying pan. Brush sauce over fish and continue turning and brushing sauce layering more and more sauce each time the fish is turned over.
5: Cut chilled rice into small rectangles and then add lacquered fish fillets on top of sushi rice.
6: Serve with pickled ginger, soy sauce and wasabi.

 

 

This recipe won the Aquaculture Association of Queensland 2017 cooking competition.

WinningdishAAQcookingcompetition2017

Prep time 30 minutes.  Cook time 15 minutes.
Ingredients

 4 Jade Perch fillets
10 fl oz Chicken Stock
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/3 cup Brown sugar
1 tea spoon grated fresh ginger
1 table spoon cornflour
1 orange juice and zest

Instructions
1.  In a saucepan whisk together stock, soy, sugar, ginger, cornflour, orange juice and zest.
2. Bring to the boil, whisk lower heat and cool.
3. Place fish fillets in glaze and refrigerate for one hour.
4. Sear fish on BBQ or grill 2 minutes each side. Lower heat and cook through for a further few minutes depending on fish thickness. Be careful as glaze burns easily.
5. Pour remaining sauce into a small saucepan and boil then pour over fish and serve.

The following recipe was prepared by Martin Nash  
BELOW Martin Nash and the perch man with a pair of jade perch at the Ausyfish hatchery BELOW Martin Nash, Ausyfish trainee graduate, helps harvest jade perch at Ausyfish hatchery
Martin Nash and Bruce with a pair of jade perch breeders 800x450 Martin Nash helps with harvest 800x450
Thai Fish Cakes with cucumber sauce
IMG 3983  

Ingredients

500g silver perch or jade perch fillets, de-boned

2 teaspoons Thai red curry paste

pinch of salt

1 tablespoon fish sauce

3 snake or green beans, thinly sliced

1 tablespoon coarsely chopped coriander leaves

corn, vegetable or peanut oil

Method

Cut the fish into 2cm (3/4") cubes and blend in a food processor until it becomes a paste. Then add the fish sauce, paste and salt and blend for about 30 seconds. Transfer it to a bowl and mix the beans and coriander in thoroughly with a wooden spoon. Dip your hands in cold water first to prevent the mixture sticking, then take a small amount of mixture and make flattish fish cakes about 5cm (2") diameter and 2.5cm (1") thick. To cook, shallow fry them in a fry pan by heating the oil and frying them on both sides for about 2 minutes each, turning only once. Drain them on kitchen paper. Serve with cucumber dipping sauce.

Makes 12 fish cakes

IMG 3978 IMG 3980 IMG 3981
 
Cucumber Sauce

IMG 3979

Ingredients

80ml water

60ml white vinegar

60g sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1 cucumber

1 shallot or small onion, thinly sliced

1 small red chilli, seeds removed and chopped finely

1/2 tablespoon fish sauce

4 stalks fresh coriander, finely sliced

2 tablespoons very finely diced carrots

1 tablespoon chopped roasted peanuts

1 tablespoon chopped coriander leaves

Method

Over a medium heat, in a small saucepan, bring to boil the water, vinegar, sugar and salt. Remove from heat and cool. Peel and slice the cucumber in half along its length then slice thinly. Place in a bowl and add the shallot or onion, chilli, fish sauce, coriander stalks and carrots and mix. Add the cooled vinegar mix. Garnish with chopped peanuts and coriander leaves just prior to serving with the fish cakes.

Microscopes

This page is being built. Check back later, because much more is going to be added. :-)

MICROSCOPES

Why would you use a microscope? 

Early detection can save fish lives, which equals saving you money. A microscope will help you identify diseases. 

In a basic aquatic environment, Host + Pathogen + Unsuitable Environment = Disease. Growing fish in an artificial environment usually = unsuitable environment. Its not that your have a bad system, or something is wrong with your pond or tank water. It's just that it is not a natural environment. Particularly when it comes to stocking density. Therefore if we had a situation free of any one of the above mentioned components, will reduce or remove the possibility of disease occurring.  Disease causing organisms are usually present most of the time, even in good conditions, and especially in open ponds. All it just takes a stress of some kind, whether it be temperature, water quality, handling etc to occur and this stress can reduce the fishes natural immune response.  Whilst the immune response of the fish is hampered, diseases are able to take hold, probably affecting productivity and fish performance or even to the point of killing them. Neither scenario makes for profitable farming.  That’s where microscopes can be a powerful management tool to a fish grower. You need to know how to use them and what sort to use.

There three main types of microscopes, the Stereo Monocular and Binocular and Dissecting Microscopes.

It is import to take regular samples of fish for observation, as early detection of disease, will save you fish losses. The easiest and most common sample is a skin smear. Gil samples should also be taken.

Common infections include:

  • Monogenean infestations from Gyrodactylid or Dactylogrids, commonly referred to as flukes
  • Ectoparasitic Protozoans such as White Spot (Ich Infection), Chilodonella & Trichodina
  • Bacterial, Columnaris Infection
  • Fungal Infection, Saprolegnia

 The members area of this web site has detailed information about jade perch, including growing and disease management  click for more

20161028 155030 636x640 Dust and moisture are the enemy of the microscope 640x360 HIGH POWERED MICROSCOPE WITH CAMERA 360x640
 A medium powered Binocular microscope.  CENTRE: Dust and moisture are the enemy of microscopes. keep them covered or in their box when not in use. A high power binocular with camera.
Low power dissecting microscope 360x640

 

LEFT: This low power dissecting microscope is ideal for looking at larger pathogens such as Anchor worm (Lernaea) and Argulus, or fish lice, and any larger objects. If you look closely at this picture, (or right click and open picture in a new tab.) you will see there is corrosion from the salty water that came in with the samples. This microscope is 23 years old, but it could last anopther 20 years if it had been maintained correctly.

RIGHT: I use the dissecting microscope to look at larvae as well as pathogens. The jade perch larvae on the right are 5 days old. you can see their stomach is full of food.

 close view day 5
On the right is a YouTube video of our larvae hatching under the dissecting microscope.   larvaeclick to view

    

Murray cod

Recommended food supplier www.bignutrition.com.au

How big do the get ?

Murray cod only half grown.
This species can easily reach more than 100 pounds. That's over 45 kg.
The largest Murray cod recorded, in 1902, weighed about 113.5kg, that's over 250 pounds. It was 1.8 meters long, and was about 75 to 114 years old.

Historical picure of large Murray cod
Australia has a number of freshwater cod species which all look very similar, however the species from the Murray Darling River Basins is the one widely produced in Australia. The other species are too endangered to allow commercial aquaculture. These other species are mostly produced for conservation purposes. The licensing of these species is strictly controlled by government. All Murray cod sold by the commercial hatcheries in Australia will be, Maccullochella peelii.
Murray cod are suitable for grow-out in tanks and raceways. High density production in open ponds is problematic as the natural territorial behavior is highly aggressive, resulting in physical injury, often cannibalism. Keeping the fish in high densities in a recirculating aquaculture system, (RAS) has produced the best results. Stocking densities of about 30-40kg/m3 produce the best results with some highly efficient systems capable of up to 60kg/m3. Best results should be achieved at temperatures around 25C. They can tolerate temperatures as low as 5C and up to 30C for brief periods. They have the ability to continue to grow at much lower temperatures than jade perch.
The supply of fry and fingerlings is very limited. They are available for only a few weeks from late November through to about February. This is because this species usually only breeds once each season. Silver perch and jade perch will continue to produce eggs and spawn for several months. The perch females can spawn several times each season, however Murray cod females usually only spawn once each season.

 

These pictures are typical of the size produced in Australia for the table.

Murraycod2  Murraycod3

LEFT: Young adults with some juveniles. RIGHT:                              Short video stripping eggs from a 10kg Murray cod.

MurrayyoungCodyoung Stripping Murray cod eggs

 

Video links

This video is a lecture by Dr Brett ingrham on genetic research potental for Murray cod. click here Duration 19 minutes.

Murray cod video about Government activities breeding Murray cod. Duration 5 minutes

Web links to Australian Government research and recommendations

https://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/aquaculture/publications/species-freshwater/murray-cod-aquaculture-prospects

https://vfa.vic.gov.au/aquaculture/murray-cod-aquaculture/maintaining-healthy-murray-cod

https://vfa.vic.gov.au/aquaculture/murray-cod-aquaculture

https://www.mdba.gov.au/sites/default/files/archived/native-fish/Overview-of-the-history-fishery-biology.pdf

http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicspecies.pl?taxon_id=66633

http://awsassets.wwf.org.au/downloads/fs033_managing_fish_translocation_and_stocking_in_murray_darling_basin_1feb03.pdf

http://www.publish.csiro.au/search?q=murray+cod

Integrated Agri-Aquaculture Demonstration Facility (PDF)

Evaluation of the Potential for Aquaculture on Cotton ... - Inside Cotton (PDF)

 

Aquaculture Videos

Recommended food supplier www.bignutrition.com.au

Please note that any reference and or research to, or about silver perch, will mostly also apply to jade perch.

The following is a list of knowledge resources containing references to professional research, videos of conference presentations, videos with useful information, and experiences from various resources about aquaculture and Australian native species in general.

Unpacking fry and fingerlings that have been packed using modern methods, at very high commercial densities. If you do not follow these instructions your fish will almost certainly die within minutes of unpacking.

click to view video (4 minutes 40 sec)

Watch this video while reading the following explaination of each step.

UNPACKING PROCEDURE IN DETAIL

You will need

  1. Two buckets of about 10 litres each. 20 litre buckets are OK but it is best if one is 10 litre.
  2. Plastic bags that will hold at least 30 litres
  3. Large rubber bands
  4. One industrial oxygen cylinder with regulator and trigger
  5. Common plain salt. (Not table salt as this may have additives.)
  6. One teaspoon
  7. P.H. meter
  8. One fine net about 12 inches

STEP 1.

Prepare a bag of water with a heaped tea spoon of salt. Allow the salt to dissolve perhaps by giving the bag a bit of a shake before adding the oxygen. The water should not have a P.H. higher than 7.2. Neutral P.H. is best. (7.0) Place the bag in one of the buckets.

Place the net over the top of the second bucket to be ready to pour the fish into.  

STEP 2.

Raise the oxygen level of the water in the bag which is in your first bucket. Do this by strongly bubbling the pure oxygen into the water in the bag. Before you start bubbling squeeze all the air out of the bag so you can trap the pure oxygen in the bag. To trap the pure oxygen in the bag hold the bag closed at the top. Once the bag is full of pure oxygen, as a result of the strong bubbling you have done, close the top of the bag by rolling it over so it will be secure enough to hold the oxygen inside the bag.

STEP 3.

Remove the rubber bands from the goose neck of the bag. Grip one bottom corner of the bag then tip the bag up-side-down over the net on the bucket. Be careful when you grip the corner of the bag not to squash any of the fish. Rest the goose neck of the bag at the base of the net, then lift the bag slowly to allow the water and the fish to drain into the net. If you have used a bucket of about 10 litres the water will fill the bucket so the fish will still be in the water.

This needs to be done very smoothly because the fish can become damaged if you rub the net against the fishes slime coated skin. You need a net that is big enough so it is possible to hold the net closed above the mass of fish held in the net. Don't squeeze the fish in the net and try not to pour the fish from the net into the bag, rather hold the net closed above the fish and release your grip over the bag of new water and let the fish drop into the new water.

Watch the video of this action so you can see how to do it with the minimum of stress and contact between the fish and the net. Perhaps practice this step with a net of something that is like fish to handle. Perhaps frozen peas or some other substance to give the mass and feel to help you make this action smooth and quick.

Re-gassing the bag must be done immediately! There must be no delay between the fish being placed in the new water and the re-gassing. When you are re-gassing the bag be very sure to have the oxygen tube below the water level so the oxygen is bubbled into the water. After re-gassing the bag replace the rubber band and put the bag of fish back in the box. Leave the lid off. This allows the fish to recover while getting used to being in the light. Empty the bucket with the net and place the net back over the bucket ready for the next bag of fish.

Repeat this process for every bag of fish in the shipment. After at least one hour, but not more than 2 hours, go to step 4.

Step 4.

Now the fish can be released into your tank, or pond.

If you have followed the process correctly they should be swimming well and upright. You can give them a small amount of food, but only a small amount, no matter how much they might appear to want to feed. The full amount of feed can be given the next day.

 

A short film showing sorting perch at pond, weighing and moving market size fish using anesthetic.

Click to view video (2.46 minutes.)

 

Dr Stuart Rowland Click for information about Dr Stuart Rowland and these videos

Silver Perch Aquaculture, Research and Development.

Click to view video (Duration 46 minutes.)

 

Dr Stuart Rowland Diseases and Health Management of Silver Perch. Click for information about Dr Stuart Rowland and these videos

Click for video PART 1 (Duration 46 minutes.)    Click for video PART 2 (Duration 43 minutes.) 

Download PDF of related work. NOTE, any references to the use of chemicals should be considered in conjunction with the current regulations to chemical use in your local jurisdiction. Please check the current rules and regulations that apply to your individual situation first! 

Development of a Health Management Strategy for the Development of the Silver Perch Aquaculture Industry. 

 

Click this link for the most resent on Diagnosis, treatment & prevention of the diseases of the Silver Perch HIGHLY RECOMMENDED READING ! Applies equally to jade perch !


Aquatic Plant Remediation of Waste Water in a Partitioned Aquaculture System. 

Click to view video (Duration 16 minutes.)

What should a commercial perch pond look like? Click for a 6.5 minute video.

Cage culture of silver perch, experiments and research. Presented by David Foley as a PhD Student with the University of New England. NOTE: Jade perch are well suited to cage culture methods. In fact commercial growers have experienced better results with jade perch in cages, tanks, and partitioned aquaculture systems. Therefor this video is also of particular interest to jade perch growers.

Click to view video (Duration 24 minutes.)

Download PDF of this work: Performance, welfare and production strategies for the cage culture of silver perch

 

This short video shows how to use floating cages on a large farm water storage to grow perch. (Duration 3.5 minutes) NOTE: Jade perch are well suited to cage culture methods. In fact commercial growers have experienced better results with jade perch in cages, tanks, and partitioned aquaculture systems. Therefor this video is also of particular interest to jade perch growers.

Click to view video (Duration 24 minutes)

 

An interesting video showing the way seafood is sold in Asia. Almost all live. See the farms, distribution network and live in restaurants. click here

Buy Jade Perch

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Buy Jade perch fry direct from hatchery in Australia. 

 For detailed information about jade perch go to the members area click for more

Did you want to buy silver perch fingerlings? click here

For information about other freshwater Australian species click here.

Our fingerlings are produces under a Fish Health certification Program

Genetic selected / improved breeders Read more about our breeding program

Want fish that are table size It's no so easy to find jade perch in any retail outlet in any of the Australian cities. There is not enough production for it to be offered to the broader market. It's a long story, but essentially all these fish come from family businesses. Farms run by families. They are all making a good, secure living. It would be a big move, and risk, to jump to the "broarder market", supermarket outlets. The Asian community in our cities pretty much consume all the production. I personally have been looking into the option to have it delivered to "mum's" door. It's an obvious market, health conscious mum, or just generally health conscious people that want to eat this regularly. The best I can do at the moment is send it in a box lots, of whole, chilled jade, or silver perch, which you must collect from your local airport, and you collect it there. 

We would have to pack a minimum of 15kg. 
Freight is minimal, I can let you know exactly if you are interested. 
The fish will be $22 per KG. 
Shipping is every Tuesday and Wednesday. 
You can pick it up next morning. We can sometimes send on a direct Sydney flight to arrive in a couple of hours from packing, or a few more hours to Melbourne or Adelaide. Email me if you are interested: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Netting jade perch on the Barcoo River

Your fry will come from Australia's most experienced breeder and live fish shipper. 

  • Over 35 years experience shipping live fish.
  • Largest breeder of Jade perch in Australia.
  • Best quality fry using managed genetics for fast growing qualities. Breeders sourced from the best growers in Australia, and managed using wild caught jade perch direct from their natural habitat. No loss of fast growing gene.
  • Packing usually 500 fry per box, depending on destination.
  • Full health certification provided when required.
  • Approved disease free export facility. Fully certified hatchery. 
  • Minimum 20 boxes per order.

Also available: Murray cod, silver perch, and sleepy cod.

A shipment of Australian JADE perch fry at Queenslands Brisbane Airport  HongKongshipment

4-5cm Fingerlings are will be available for Australian domestic customers. Larger fingerlings of over 8cm available depending delivery logistics.

If you are in Western Australia we can not send you jade perch.

If you are not in Australia you need to be aware that export of Australian native fish is complicated, involving many permits, restrictions and many conditions that are in place for the receiving country. Therefore we cannot sent less than AUD$3,000.00 of fish, PLUS shipping and associated costs.

More information below.

  • 30- 49 --- $2.31 each including GST
  • 50- 99 --- $2.20 each including GST
  • 100-500 -- $1.43 each including GST
  • Over 500 --- $0.94 each including GST
  • NOTE: GST does not allpy to export orders.
  • F1 fry are available by arrangement. Minimum order 10,000 $1.15 each.
  • 1.0 - 3.5 cm FRY. WHOLESALE PRICES OVER 10,000 AUD$0.43 each plus GST.
  • Food can be ordered and delivered with fingerlings.
  • For small quantities email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • For commercial quantities of aquaculture feed see this link. Recommended food supplier www.bignutrition.com.au

Please note the minimum quantity for export is 3,000 fish at AUD $1.00 each OR AUD$3,000. We can't export small quantityies of fish. This is because of the very involved process to export live Australian native fish. The airlines also usually impose minimum freight weights. Usually they charge for 100kg even if you only send a single box of 11kg. The process for sending live fish itself is very involved. It is therefor necessary to have a shipment that has the economies of scale to cover the whole process. The minimum shipment value is AUD$3,000.00 fish value, plus all the other shipping costs.

Taking orders now for bulk quantities for 2018 -19 season. Don't miss out. Production is limited.

1.00 - 3.5 cm FRY WHOLESALE PRICES OVER 10,000 AUD$0.43. Plus GST Ask for a quote on "landed" cost to your local airport.

Full health certification available upon request.

For detailed information about growing jade perch and managing their health see the members area.

We regularly ship to many countries around the world, including, Malaysia, mainland China, Taiwan, Europe, Hong Kong and the United States.

 

hundreds of thousands of jade perch larvae Jade perch story part 1 The Jade perch story Part 2 WILD BROODSTOCK Finding The Fish Jade perch story part 3 croped

Click to email bruce, the Perch Man, strictly for orders over 10,000. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

For small quantities under 10,000 email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PLEASE NOTE, PREFERED METHOD OF CONTACT IS EMAIL BECAUSE I AM OFTEN AWAY FROM THE PHONE.

(Phone numbers are provided strictly for orders over 10,000 fish, or emergencies, only.)

Or phone: International: 617 4126 2257 Cell 61 407 797 149             Local call 07 4126 2257 or mobile 0407 797 149

Habitat

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For detailed information about jade perch go to the members area click for more

Jade Perch come from an area of Australia known as the Lake Eyre Basin. Here, the water does not drain into rivers that end up in the ocean. All the rain that falls in this region drains inland, eventually reaching Lake Eyre, provided there is enough rain to make it that far. This is a huge area. Some of the catchment reaches up into tropical parts. Occasionally the remnants of a cyclone, in the form of a tropical depression, reach down to the top end of the catchment. This sort of event can result in large amount of rain flooding vast inland areas of country. For the fish in the waterholes of the Lake Eyre Basin such events create a massive explosion in the food chain. Mass spawning occurs and the cycle of fish life starts again.

Jade perch only occur naturally in this area of Australia. The best candidate for aquaculture may quite possibly, only be the one from the Barcoo River. No other place in the world.

 

Lake Eyre and Murray-Darling Fitzroy-Dawson basins Sat view Australia Sat view Lake Eyre Barcoo River
River basins of Australia with the Lake Eyre Basin in Red.

SEE jadeperchman on YouTube

Click this link for a 10 minute YouTube video of the trip to the Barcoo River. This is part 1 of the Jade Perch Story

Click for part 2 of the jade perch story

Click this link for a short YouTube video of the country on the way to the Barcoo River.

Click for a short YouTube video fly down the Barcoo River

Click for a short YouTube video of jade perch being collected from the Barcoo River

Transporting live fish video

 

trackwithcows  Lots of dust on the long trip  Aridcountry

LakeEyresign  Barcooriversign  Barcooriver

Broadwaterhole  endwaterhole  Netting1

For detailed information about jade perch go to the members area click for more

Omega 3

HOME
For detailed information about jade perch go to the members area click for more

Did you want to buy fingerlings? click here

Recipes for perch click here

Want fish that are table size 

It's no so easy to find jade perch in any retail outlet in any of the Australian cities. There is not enough production for it to be offered to the broader market. It's a long story, but essentially all these fish come from family businesses. Farms run by families. They are all making a good, secure living. It would be a big move, and risk, to jump to the "broarder market", supermarket outlets. The Asian community in our cities pretty much consume all the production. I personally have been looking into the option to have it delivered to "mum's" door. It's an obvious market, health conscious mum, or just generally health conscious people that want to eat this regularly. The best I can do at the moment is send it in a box lots, of whole, chilled jade, or silver perch, which you must collect from your local airport, and you collect it there. 

We would have to pack a minimum of 15kg. 
Freight is minimal, I can let you know exactly if you are interested. 
The fish will be $22 per KG. 
Shipping is every Tuesday and Wednesday. 
You can pick it up next morning. We can sometimes send on a direct Sydney flight to arrive in a couple of hours from packing, or a few more hours to Melbourne or Adelaide. Email me if you are interested: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Omega-3 the good oil !

Jade perch and silver perch - super foods

Australian JADE perch come from the Barcoo River in Queensland Australia!  Barcooriver

SEE jadeperchman on YouTube

The fat contained in these Australian JADE perch is the “good” fat, omega-3.

Way back in 1998 of over 200 seafoods tested by the CSIRO Jade Perch contained the highest levels of omega-3.
The second highest was the Swordfish, 1,667 milligrams of the good oil to every 100 grams.
Australian JADE Perch, from Queensland contained an incredible 2483 mg/100gm of omega-3 oils.

The marketing name, "JADE perch" was chosen because of the distinctive greenish, (JADE) colour displayed by the fish as the light catches the dorasl area scales. Jade also suggests something of value, and valuable they are. They eat very well and have a firm, slightly flaky flesh.  
The fish come from a very hostile environment. Fish in Australian rivers must be able to cope well with the “feast and famine” nature of the rivers systems in Australia. These rivers can be dry for months, even years. Large water holes are the surviving refuge for many species of Australian native fishes, including Australian JADE perch. The fish in these water holes predate on each other for survival. After flooding the natural food supply for these fish is abundant. This glut of food is a contrast in the extreme compared to a drought situation where the fish will find getting a feed very difficult. Also during winter (usually the dry season) the fish are inactive and probably rarely feed. The stored fat will be used to help the fish survive in these situations. This is the Omega-3 fat humans need to thrive.

The following is adapted from an article written by Bruce Sambell for the Aquaculture Association of Queensland INc. Newsletter November 2000, author Bruce Sambell.”

SILVER PERCH KNOCKED OFF IT’S PERCH
BY BRUCE SAMBELL
In 1998 the CSIRO completed their fatty acids analysis of JADE perch, and guess what, the levels of Omega-3 content in Australian JADE perch are higher than over 200 species tested. This means that the Omega-3 content of our farmed JADE perch is the highest of over 200 Australian seafood's to undergo these tests. This testing was conducted at the CSIRO Marine Research Laboratories, Hobart as part of an FRDC project 99/331.
Silver perch had already undergone tests for it’s Omega-3 levels, however some doubt had been cast as to whether the fish tested were in fact silver perch or possibly Welch’s perch crossed with silver perch. The CSIRO subsequently confirmed the previous results. The samples were provided by the Government Research Facility in Grafton New South Wales.
Omega-3 results for Silver perch and JADE perch showed that JADE perch has 11.1% Omega-3, compared to Silver perch with 9.9%. Both species have excellent levels of omega-3.
JADE perch oil in the flesh, 24.1% compared with Sawfish with 1667mg per 100g.
There are also some differences in the other “oils”. Some are higher in Jade Perch, some are lower, but all are very good overall!

What about this stuff (omega-3) ? What’s so good about it? Well it seems it really can help you live longer. It has benefits to human blood vessels, helps protect against heart rhythm disorders, may even help protect against some forms of cancer. The list goes on, infants brain and retina function and development my also benefit, as well as reduce coronary heart disease, high blood pressure and rheumatoid arthritis.
Our Perch also contains lower levels of cholesterol than chicken, beef and lamb! Not even alternative products such as chicken, beef and lamb have anywhere near the levels of omega-3. JADE perch has 10 to 100 times more omega-3 than these more traditional food products.
Here are some quotes from the CSIRO,
“the unique nutritional benefits of marine oils come from the effects of their long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and particularly DHA and EPA.
“the body can only make small amounts of these fatty acids and therefore we rely on dietary sources...
“ Australian fish have higher levels of the beneficial fatty acid DHA than fish from northern hemisphere waters.
“Other beneficial oils present in seafood
(a term which includes farmed fish ...) include omega-6AA which is important for growth and seems to play a role in our general good health and well-being.
Omega-3 found in Australian JADE perch...
Reduces Aggression. You are less likely to express stress-induced aggression if your brain is under the influence of fish oil, according to Japanese researchers. In a new double-blind test of 41 adult students, those taking 1.5 to 1.8 daily grams of DHA fish oil for three months did not become more socially aggressive at a time of severe mental stress: final exams. In contrast, students taking a dummy look-alike capsule showed significant jumps in social aggression, as measured by psychological tests. This effect on stress may help explain how fish oil prevents heart disease. Stress hormones triggered by hostility and anger can constrict arteries and accelerate the formation of blockages, research shows; fish oil may suppress the release of those hormones.
Stimulates young minds. Foetuses and infants must get sufficient omega-3 oils for optimal brain development, says William Connor, Oregon Health Sciences University. In one telling study of premature infants, those fed breast milk had 8 points higher I.Q. at age 8 than those fed standard infant formula. Connor credits breast milk's higher amounts of DHA for that superior intelligence. In infant rhesus monkeys deprived of omega-3-type oils, Connor found severely impaired visual acuity and behaviour indicative of a neurological defect. Autopsies revealed abnormalities in brain cells. Connor advises pregnant women to eat fish a couple of times a week, especially during the last trimester, the time of greatest foetal brain growth. And breast feeding is preferable to infant formula, he says.

Blunts Brain Damage? Fish oil may eventually be proved to lessen alcohol-induced brain damage, Salem says. He explains that excessive alcohol depletes brain levels of omega-3's -- DHA in particular -- which leads to neurological damage and impaired vision. He put experimental animals on high-alcohol, low omega-3 diets for six months to three years. They suffered severe losses of DHA in brain cells and detrimental changes in brain functioning. Some scientists speculate that fish oil also may have a protective role in degenerative brain diseases leading to memory loss and dementia. The brains of deceased Alzheimer's sufferers, for example, show low levels of omega-3 fats.
Food for thought ! ?

Reference: 

CSIRO Marine Research 2002 FRDC Project 1999/331 2002 B.D.Mooney, P.D. Nichols, N.G. Elliott 

The findings are published in a booklet titled...Seafood The Good Food II 

Page 51 of that booklet shows the list of oils contained in Scortum Barcoo (which is commonly known as Jade Perch.)

Total fatty acids = 15785 (per 100g)

of that,

Total saturates = 5437

Total monounsaturates = 5267

Total polyunsaturates = 4938

Total (n-3) = 3869

Total (n-6) = 667

Click for CSIRO report

Second report comparison jade perch and Murray cod. Note jade perch are refeed to as striped perch.

And . . . apart from all that . . . they make a great meal. As Theodore Pung from Singapore can confirm. 

To open images, right click - open in new tab.

 Theodore enjoys a jade perch meal 2 640x480 Theodore enjoys a jade perch meal 4 640x480Theodore enjoys a jade perch meal 9 640x480

 

cookedjade Openfillet Crummedandyummy

For detailed information about jade perch go to the members area click for more

About Bruce

HOME

3400gramsilverperch SEE jadeperchman on YouTube

The PERCH MAN ABN is 42 065 149 145

Contact details at botom of page.

The members area has detailed information about jade perch, including growing and disease management  click for more

AQUACULTURE CONSLUTINGAcording to the Cambridge Dictionary an expert is, "a person with a high level of knowledge or skill relating to a particular subject or activity." My advice is based on over 30 years experience and hands on practice. What is the difference between a good consultant and a bad consultant? A bad consultant thinks he knows everything. A good consultant knows he does not know everything, but he knows someone who can answer questions about things he does not know. 

Three levels of consulting services are available to clients starting from AUD$25.00 for level 1

Level 2  Many clients use this as an opportunity to have staff trained in better fish handling practices. AUD$450.00 per day plus expences.

Level 3 - Premium Service.

Click for full details. Aquaculture consulting

Bruce Sambell, often called the Jade Perch Man, or Perch Man, is the founder and designer of Ausyfish Pty LtdBruce has been involved with fish at a commercial level for almost 40 years. His role as industry consultant has provided cross sector experience at many levels. Sound advice is available to existing industry participants and especially those considering entering freshwater finfish aquaculture.
Considerable experience has been gained during the commercial development of Australian native perch. 
Bruce was the first to breed many species, including sleepy cod, freshwater archer fish, and a number of small Australian native varieties for aquariums. Bruce was one of the first to ever spawn JADE perch. He has now been consistently breeding them longer than anyone currently in the industry.

Bruce has been the president of the Aquaculture Association of Queensland Inc for over 20 years. Bruce was also Vice President of the Queensland Aquaculture Industries Federation Inc., (QAIF) for over 3 years. Bruce sat on the committee of QAIF for over 14 years. Bruce also sat on a number of Government bodies as an industry consultant, including the Queensland Department of State Development and Innovation's Aquaculture Reference Group,  the Queensland Freshwater Management Advisory Committee, the Translocation Sub-Committee for freshwater fish, and Queensland's Stocked Impoundment Permit Scheme Sub-Committee. (An advisory body for stocking freshwater fish in lakes and rivers throughout Queensland for recreational anglers.) He was also the industry "food safety" representative for a number of years. As part of his role as industry leader he coordinated many major aquaculture conferences and training workshops. He also sat on several regional advisory bodies, including, the Fisheries Regional Development Committee for Hervey Bay and the Fisheries Regional Development Committee, Bundaberg.

In 1999 Bruce was made “Patron” for ANGFA ACT., Australian New Guinea Fishes Association.
In 2000 he was appointed to the, “working group” for the Conservation Genetics Inventory Project for Murray Darling River Fish.

Bruce also built the Ausyfishfish farm from 1988. He still acts as adviser for the facility. Take a YouTube look at Ausyfish. 

Bruce was one of the first to breed JADE perch in captivity. He has been breeding JADE perch for over 20 years. Longer than any other producer of JADE perch in Australia. 

Bruce was fundamental in the introduction of the Freshwater Finfish Commercial Hatchery Code of Practice In September 2000 the WWF, (World Wild Life Fund) hosted a workshop for the Murray-Darling Basin Authority. The workshop was attended by Bruce. Stocking fingerlings was identified as a potential threat to the fish of the river basins. Disease, genetic pollution, and unwanted translocations were considered to be major threats to the natural populations of native fish. It was also a significant concern that there was no means of identifying hatcheries from other aquaculture sites. This workshop identified the need for some sort of hatchery accreditation. On August 15th 2006 Bruce presented a paper to the Queensland Government resulting in support and funding from the Queensland Government to develop a code of practice. As the then President of the Aquaculture Association of Queensland Inc., Bruce guided the development of this industry code of practice.

Some other codes of practice introduced by Bruce include, Queensland Freshwater Finfish Environmental Code of Practice Queensland Aquaculture Food Safety Plan A Development Plan for the Queensland Native Freshwater Finfish Industry Also a freshwater finfish disease free certification scheme. This scheme, The Fish Health Certification Program (FHCP) was developed with the cooperation of all the east coast states of Australia.

The members area has detailed information about jade perch, including growing and disease management  click for more

000 0064 000 0066 AAQCommitteemeeting8thMarch2006

CONTACT INFORMATION. Note, due to frequent international travel, phone contact may be difficult and email replys may be delayed.

Email:    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone: 0407797149     If calling from outside Australia:   +61 407797149

WeChat: BrucePerchMan

YouTube:  jadeperchman

Facebook: Bruce Sambell

LinkedIn:   Bruce Sambell

WhatsApp: Bruce Perch Man

Viber: Bruce Sambell +61407797149

Other websites

www.ausyfish.com  Perchman

Jade Perch Info

HOME

The members area has detailed information about jade perch, including growing and disease management. click here

Did you want to order silver perch fingerlings? click here

Want fish that are table size, ready to eat, click here.

AQUACULTURE CONSULTING Advice is available at your aquaculture site or farm, to existing and potential growers of Australian freshwater fish. Advice is based on over 30 years experience and hands on practice. 

DISEASE FREE CERTIFIED FRY AND FINGERLINGS

Regular disease surveillance testing by gross and histopathology performed by the Biosecurity Sciences Laboratory (BSL) of the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF-Qld), Queensland State Government. The purpose of health testing is to afford the highest probability of detecting significant and notifiable diseases in the fish intended for sale and translocation to other states, or overseas. Click for more 

It all starts with the eggs hatching. In this YouTube video you can see the larvae breaking out of the egg shells. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uu39J-Sq_bs

SEE jadeperchman on YouTube

The marketing name, "JADE perch" was chosen because of the distinctive greenish, (JADE) colour displayed by the fish as the light catches the dorasl area scales. The name was chosen by the worlds FIRST 3 pioneer growers of Australian JADE perch while sitting around the kitchen table of the, then president for the Aquaculture Association of Queensland Inc., Bruce Sambell. (The JADE PERCH MAN.) The common, local name, was Barcoo Grunter, which does not sound as pleasant as JADE perch.

They eat very well and have a firmer, slightly flaky flesh than Silver Perch. They grow extremely fast and are highly suited for aquaculture in areas with a moderate sub tropical to tropical climate. They are also proving to be a good species for recirculating aquaculture systems. (RAS) (Unlike silver perch which are very difficult to grow beyond a few hundred grams in a RAS.) The fish come from a very hostile environment. Fish in Australian rivers must be able to cope well with the “feast and famine” nature of many of the river systems in Australia. These rivers can be dry for months, even years. Large water holes are the surviving refuge for many species of Australian native fishes, especially JADE perch. The fish in these water holes predate on each other for survival. After flooding the natural food supply for these fish is abundant. This glut of food is a contrast in the extreme compared to a drought situation where the fish will find getting a feed very difficult. Also during the cooler water temperatures experienced in winter (usually the dry season) the fish are less active and probably rarely feed. The stored fat will be used to help the fish survive in these situations. In aquaculture, fish are grown in an artificial environment such as a commercial fish pond or a RAS. They are in fact being kept in a “feast” situation. The fish grow rapidly and store fat as quick as they can, to be ready for the “famine”, which never comes in a controled aquaculture situation.

This fish sure has a great place in commercial aquaculture !

A shipment of Australian JADE perch fry at Queenslands Brisbane Airport 360gmseggs

Purging or "finishing"

Some people can detect a taste that they describe as “off flavour”. Freshwater fish are often referred to as having a weedy, muddy or off-flavour. There are 3 chemicals responsible for these tastes. The weedy taste is usually caused by the algae present in ponds where the fish were raised, as is the muddy flavour caused by turbid water in pond raised fish. None of these are harlmfull, just not pleasent to the tast. Obviously this is very undesirable. The chemicals that cause these off flavours are concentrated in the skin and fat of the fish.

The remedy is simple. If the fish are held in very clean water for a few days these flavours can be removed. Generally the purging, or finishing time is 7 days, sometimes longer. It is recommended that before fish are sent to market that the grower taste test 2 or 3 fish from each batch. If there are no “off flavours” present, the product can be said to be “finished,” or market ready. When properly purged of these off flavours, these fish have excellent table qualities. The flesh is white, slightly flaky, and has a delicate, melt in the mouth texture. A tip when cooking, is to cook a little longer that you might many "sea" or salt water fish. The longer you cook them the firmer and drier the flesh will become. As a freshwater fish, the fillet is a lot more moist than salt water fish. If not cooked for long enough, the fillet can be a little "mushy" in texture. Too soft, and too moist. Another tip... The chemicals that cause these off flavours are concentrated in the skin and fat of the fish. A skin off fillet will always tast the best.

Some people believe the purging of the fish in salted water makes the flesh taste better. This is not scientificly supported. There is no actual change in the texture, or flavour of the fish due to the salt content of the purging water. Although the salt in the purging water is of great benifit to the fish, (I have always said salt is the asprin of aquaculture, and should always be used when handling fresh water fish. In fact if a professional grower, or hatchery operater did not use salt, he makes things difficult for himself, and his fish.) it actually has no biological effect on the flesh. The salt content of the fishes body, including the mussel tissue will always be the same through the fishes ability to *osmoregulate the salt in its body. There are exceptions such as barramundi, but jade and silver perch undergo NO changes when kept in high levels of salt. Too little, or too much salt will stress the fish. When handeling live fish, such as harvesting, the fish become stressed, and lose salt to their "freshwater" environment. A little salt added to their water is extreamly helpful. I recomend 2 to 5 parts per thousand, (ppt). That's 2 to 5 grams per liter. A salt content of 10ppt will result in stock losses for jade and silver perch. At levels above 10ppm the fish experience difficulties balancing the salt levels in their bodies. No matter how much salt you add to the water, the fish will try to regulate the salt content of their bodies. This is known as osmoregulation. Osmoregulation is the regulation of a cells fluids. It keeps the mussel tissue of the fish from becoming to dry or becoming to fluid. It regulates the salt content and what waste to get rid of and what to keep) The salt in the purging water does help the fish to purge their gut, and helps with parasite management. It is also a mild antiseptic. It also acts as a mild anaethetic keeping the fish calmer. For greater detail on the use of salt and other chemicals to manage and treat disease go to the members area. click here for more

Growing Australian JADE perch. Queensland Jade Perch are best grown in water temperatures above 24c and below 33C. Fastest growth is around 26C. They will survive temperatures as low as 11C for reasonably short periods, but can go as low a 9c and as high as 39c are possible, but probably not for long. Best pH range between 6.0 and 9. Will tolerate pH levels between 5.5 and 10. Food conversion ratios (FCR's) for jade perch are generally in the range of 1.3-2:1 (kg of food: weight growth) Feed at about 2-4% body weight per day. WHAT SHOULD YOU FEED THEM? Good quality commercial aquaculture feed is best. See this link for commercial quantities. www.bignutrition.com.auFor small quantities email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Salinity levels of 5g per litre of sodium chloride (plain salt) are, acceptable for long-term exposure and can be used to treat ectoparasite and fungal diseases. No mortality at salinity of 12ppt , up to 40% losses can be experienced at 15ppt

The amount of fish that can be produced in a pond is greatly dependant on aeration, and water temperature. The higher the temperature the lower the oxygen. Put simply, this is because less oxygen can be dissolved in water at higher temperatures. The fishes demand for oxygen is also increased as the temperature of the pond increases. The higher the temperature the greater the metabolic rate of the fish. From the farmers point of view, they grow faster, BUT, generally for every ten degrees that the temperature increases, the fishes metabolic rate doubles. Therefor without aeration less fish can be produced in the same area. Since Australia JADE perch grow twice as fast as Queensland Silver Perch at higher temperatures, they require more aeration. As a rough guide a one acre pond with one 2hp paddle wheel will grow about 5-6 ton of Australian JADE perch. Some produces believe that this size pond is not well suited to two paddle wheels. If a 1.25 acre pond is used two paddle wheels can be used to best advantage to raise 6-7 ton of fish.

How big do they get?

7inchestall 19incheslong

We actually don't know the answer to this question just yet. In their natural environment, they don't get anywhere near as big as the one in these pictures. The fish in these pictures weighs 3.2 kilo. This is an aquacultured fish. (Note the "plate friendly" shape.) They just don't get this big in the wild. Is this probably because they don't get a chance to live long enough, or the conditions are not good enough, not enough food and too cold in winter? Another consideration is improved genetics. For many years the breeders have been selected for their fast growing qualities. The slow growers are never used as breeders. This will be having an influence on the potential size of the off-spring. It will be a few more years before we have the answers to these questions. Click here for more

Our fingerlings are produces under a Fish Health certification Program

For detailed information about growing jade perch, and their health management (Disease management.) go to the members area of this web site.

AQUACULTURE CONSULTING  Advice is available at your aquaculture site or farm, to existing and potential growers of Australian freshwater fish. Advice is based on over 30 years experience and hands on practice. 

 

floatingcages   Hidensitytank   largepond

Below left the Gut of a wild JADE perch with all organs visible and NO fat. RIGHT an aquacultured JADE perch which has been fed on a diet perhaps a little too rich. No organs are visible through the fat.

wildjadegut  fat1

*Keeping the osmotic pressure, the salt in their cells, in freshwater fish is a constant battle and will result is serious stress to the fish if not managed by the grower, or hatchery operator. Fresh water fish constantly face two kinds of problems, they gain water passively through their skin due to osmotic gradient, and continually lose body salts to the surrounding water of much lower salt content. Osmoregulation in fresh water fish is affected by pumping out excess of water from their bodies. The salt loss through the excretion of water is made good by salt absorbing gills, skin and various parts of the alimentary canal.

 

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